Life Sciences and Agriculture

Journal of Water and Land Development

Content

Journal of Water and Land Development | 2021 | No 51 |

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Abstract

The Nile River is the main route for inland navigation in Egypt. The vessels navigating through inland waterways generate complex physical forces that need to be studied extensively. Quantifying the effects of vessels sailing along a waterway is a complex problem because the river flow is unsteady and the river bathymetry is irregular. This paper aims to investigate the hydrodynamic effects resulting from the movement of vessels such as return currents around the vessel, the draw down of the water surface, under keel clearance, and the shear stress induced by vessels operating in the Nile River. Modeling such effects has been performed by applied the two-dimensional ADH (adaptive hydraulics) model to a river reach for different navigation channel operation scenarios. The obtained results show that the draw down heights, the water fluctuation, and the shear stress magnitude are larger when the river cross sectionals are narrow and the shallow water depths. These river sections are considered more disposed to bed erosion and it is morphologically unsafe.
The section having the narrowest width and the lowest depth was associated with the largest drawdown percentages of 98.3% and 87.3% in one-way and two-way scenarios. While the section having the widest width and the largest depth was associated with the least drawdown percentages of 48.5% and 51.9% in one-way and two-way scenarios.
The section having the narrowest width and the lowest depth was associated with the largest fluctuations of 22.0 cm and 41.9 cm in one-way and two-way scenarios. While the section having the widest width and the largest depth was associated with the least fluctuations of 0.6 cm and 1.8 cm in one-way and two-way scenarios.
The section having the narrowest width and the lowest depth was the worst section for under keel clearance of 5.0 cm and 33.3 cm in one-way and two-way scenarios. While the section having the widest width and the largest depth was the best section, where its clearance values were 183.2 cm and 155.0 cm in one-way and two-way scenarios.
It is concluded that a numerical model is a valuable tool for predicting and quantifying the hydrodynamic effects of vessels moving through a two-dimensional flow field and can be used to evaluate different scenarios that are difficult to measure in the field or a physical model. Also, it provides visualization products that help us understand the complicated forces produced by vessels moving in a navigation channel.
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Authors and Affiliations

Neveen Abdel-Mageed Badawy
1
Alaa Nabil El-Hazek
1
ORCID: ORCID
Hossam Mohamed Elsersawy
2
ORCID: ORCID
Ebtesam Rezk Mohammed
2

  1. Benha University, Faculty of Engineering at Shoubra, Department of Civil Engineering, Cairo, Egypt
  2. National Water Research Center, Nile Research Institute, Fum Ismailiya Canal, P.O. Box 74, Shoubra El-Kheima, 13411, Egypt
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Abstract

The work focused on forecasting changes in lake water level. The study employed the Triple Diagram Method (TDM) using geostatistical tools. TDM estimates the value by information from an earlier two periods of observation, refers as lags. The best results were obtained for data with an average a 1-week lag. At the significance level of 1σ, a the forecast error of ±2 cm was obtained. Using separate data for warm and cold months did not improve the efficiency of TDM. At the same time, analysis of observations from warm and cold months explained trends visible in the distribution of year-round data. The methodology, built on case study and proposed evaluation criteria, may function as a universal solution. The proposed methodology can be used to effectively manage water-level fluctuations both in postglacial lakes and in any case of water-level fluctuation.
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Authors and Affiliations

Adam Piasecki
1
ORCID: ORCID
Wojciech T. Witkowski
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Nicolaus Copernicus University, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Spatial Management, ul. Lwowska 1, 87-100, Toruń, Poland
  2. AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Mine Surveying and Environmental Engineering, Krakow, Poland
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Abstract

Today’s agriculture is facing a range of challenges, the most important of which is the adjustment to the changing climate. In this context, water management is particularly vital. Droughts in Poland are becoming more and more frequent. That fact adds to the significance of irrigation and drainage systems.
This paper is an attempt at diagnosing the condition of (in 2016) and changes in (over the period of 2006–2016) irrigation and drainage systems in the Kujawsko-Pomorskie Voivodship (analysed by communes, until 2016 – according to Local Administrative Units – LAU level 2). The multidirectional analysis involves a comprehensive description of ameliorated lands, including the allocation of the EU funds dedicated for the support of flood protection and land improvement ventures.
It has been demonstrated that the present condition of land improvement does not reflect the needs of the agriculture in the studied area and that the changes implemented on the ongoing basis fail to make the situation better. In 2016, slightly over 40% of agricultural acreage was ameliorated, while the level at which land improvement needs would be satisfied approximated 70%. In over 1/5 of the ameliorated area, facilities needed reconstruction or modernisation. Drainage systems were in the majority, which indicates that the current needs, i.e. water scarcity, are not addressed.
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Authors and Affiliations

Roman Rudnicki
1
ORCID: ORCID
Łukasz Wiśniewski
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Spatial Management, ul. Gagarina 11, 87-100 Toruń, Poland
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Abstract

Several conjunctive use approaches can be distinguished. Drought cycling of groundwater (GW) usage and storage relies on more surface water (SW) during wetter years and delivers more water from GW during drought years. This method has the benefit of temporal changes in water availability. Additionally, it is usually desirable in areas with internal variability of SW where surface storage of wet-year surpluses is uneconomical, suffer excessive evaporative losses, or cause unacceptable environmental disruption. In previous studies, the purpose of operating the drought cycling was to reduce operating costs. In these studies, the objective function of the proposed model was to minimise the present value cost derived from the system design and operation to satisfy a predefined demand during a finite planning and operation horizon. However, it is important to consider other objectives in operating water resources systems, including minimising water shortages accurately. Hence, in this study, two scenarios were focused on: 1) mi-nimising water shortagages, 2) minimising operational costs. Pareto solutions are then presented with the objectives of minimising costs and water deficit. In this study, the weighting method has been used to extract Pareto options. The results show that reducing costs from 234 to 100 mln USD will increase water shortage from 9.3 to 11.3 mln m3.
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Authors and Affiliations

Tzu-Chia Chen
1
ORCID: ORCID
Tsung-Shun Hsieh
2
Rustem A. Shichiyakh
3

  1. Dhurakij Pundit University, Bangkok, Thailand
  2. Krirk University, Thanon Ram Intra, Khwaeng Anusawari, Khet Bang Khen, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon 10220, Thailand
  3. Kuban State Agrarian University named after I.T. Trubilin, Department of Management, Krasnodar, Russian Federation
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Abstract

In 1970–2010, during the period of spring circulation and summer stagnation, hydrochemical studies were conducted in Lake Ińsko (Western Pomeranian Lake Region, Poland) with determination of the lake susceptibility to degradation and trophic changes. Also, the effect of the catchment area on the water quality in this waterbody was assessed. The waters of the study lake were characterised by low static index, which is an additional indicator of low dynamics of water masses, and low susceptibility to degradation. In spite of this, significant changes in the lake quality and trophy were observed. The hydrochemical parameters defining water quality of the study lake continued to improve. In the 70’s, the water quality was at the border of class II and III, while in 2006 and 2010 it reached the level characteristic for class I waters. Moreover, in the 70’s and 80’s of the previous century, Lake Ińsko Duże was a mesotrophic lake. Then, an increase in the lake trophy was observed, resulting in signs of eutrophy. At the end of the 90’s and in the first decade of the 21st century, the study lake returned to the state of mesotrophy. No restoration works were undertaken in Lake Ińsko in the study period. The improvement in water quality, called oligotrophication, resulted most probably from the lake reaction to changes in the soil use in the catchment area, since fewer phosphorus and nitrogen compounds flow into the lake, and also from the regulation of the wastewater management in the town of Ińsko.
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Authors and Affiliations

Jacek Kubiak
1
Sylwia Machula
1
ORCID: ORCID
Przemysław Czerniejewski
1
ORCID: ORCID
Adam Brysiewicz
2
ORCID: ORCID
Wawrzyniec Wawrzyniak
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Faculty of Food Sciences and Fisheries, Kazimierza Królewicza street 4, 71-550 Szczecin, Poland
  2. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Poland
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Abstract

Warna and Pengilon Lakes are very close to each other and connected with the sill, a famous tourist destination in the Dieng Plateau Java. Land-use changes are the main problem that affected the lakes. The conversion of forest into an agricultural area had induced erosion and increased the volume of nutrients discharged to the lake due to high use of fertilisers in potatoes farms. In the dry seasons, water from those lakes was pumped to irrigate agricultural land. This study aimed to determine the water quality of Warna and Pengilon Lakes based on physical, chemical parameters, and phytoplankton communities. Water samples were collected from 4 sites at each lake to analyse biological oxygen demand ( BOD), chemical oxygen demand ( COD), ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and total nitrogen ( TN). Temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen ( DO), turbidity, and conductivity ( EC) were measured in-situ. During this research, turbidity and BOD in Warna and Pengilon Lakes exceeded the Indonesian water quality standard. Based on the STORET method, the water quality of Lake Warna was assessed as highly polluted for all classes. However, based on the pollution index (PI), Lake Warna was slightly to moderately polluted, as well as the saprobic index was in the β-mesosaprobic phase. Based on the species diversity index of phytoplankton, both Warna and Pengilon Lakes were moderately polluted. The long-term monitoring studies are necessary as an early warning sign of water quality degradation. Therefore, they provide insight into the overall ecological condition of the lake and can be used as a basis for developing suitable lake management.
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Authors and Affiliations

Tri Retnaningsih Soeprobowati
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
Nurul Layalil Addadiyah
1
Riche Hariyati
1
ORCID: ORCID
Jumari Jumari
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Diponegoro University, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, Department of Biology, Jl. Prof. Soedarto, SH. Street, Tembalang, Semarang, 50275, Indonesia
  2. Universitas Diponegoro, School of Postgraduate Studies, Imam Bardjo Street Number 3-5, Semarang, 50241, Indonesia
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Abstract

Human activities have a complex and multidimensional impact on water quality. The concentration of inhabitants, production and services intensifies influence of urban agglomerations on water in rivers. Among many sources of surface water pollution, the most important are sewage discharges.
The aim of the research was to determine the effect of point discharge of treated industrial and municipal wastewater on the distribution of selected water chemical parameters in the Vistula River in Puławy. The studies were carried out in 2018–2019. Samplings were collected in five sampling points and tested in the hydrochemical laboratory. The obtained data were statistically analysed to investigate differences between the sampling points. The negative impact of wastewater discharge on the water quality in the Vistula was found. However, the pollution level decreased with the flow of the river. The parameters tested at measurement point located 1200 m below the discharge approached the values recorded above the sewage outfall. The presented observations of changes in the concentration of pollutants indicate the self-purification capacity of a river. However, for each watercourse flowing through urbanized areas, it is an individual feature. It depends on a number of factors and requires regular monitoring studies taking into account hydrochemical analysis of watercourses.
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Authors and Affiliations

Mateusz Jakubiak
1
ORCID: ORCID
Bartosz Bojarski
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering, Department of Environmental Management and Protection, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow, Poland
  2. Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Ichthyobiology and Aquaculture in Gołysz, Poland
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Abstract

Energy dissipator functions to dissipate the river-flow energy to avoid longitudinal damage to the downstream river morphology. An optimal energy dissipator planning is essential to fulfilling safe specifications regarding flow behavior. This study aims to determine the variation of energy dissipators and evaluate its effect on the hydraulic jump and energy dissipation. For this purpose, a physical model was carried out on the existing weir condition (two steps). It was also carried out on four stepped-weir variations, i.e., three-step, three-step with additional baffle blocks at the end sills, four-step, and six-step. Dimensional analysis was employed to correlate the different parameters that affect the studied phenomenon. The study shows a three-step jump shows a significantly higher Lj/y1 ratio, which is an advantage to hydraulic jumps’ compaction. The comparison of energy dissipation in all weir variations shows that the three-stepped weir has wasted more energy than other types. The energy dissipation increase of the three-step type is 20.41% higher than the existing type’s energy dissipation and much higher than other types. The dimensions of the energy dissipation basin are the ratio of the width and height of the stairs (l/h) of the three-step type (2.50). Therefore, this type is more optimal to reduce the cavitation risk, which damages the river structure and downstream area.
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Authors and Affiliations

Azmeri Azmeri
1
ORCID: ORCID
Hairul Basri
2
ORCID: ORCID
Alfiansyah Yulianur
1
ORCID: ORCID
Ziana Ziana
1
ORCID: ORCID
Faris Zahran Jemi
3
ORCID: ORCID
Ridha Aulia Rahmah
1

  1. Syiah Kuala University, Faculty of Engineering, Civil Engineering Department, Jl. Tgk. Syeh Abdul Rauf No. 7, Darussalam – Banda Aceh 23111, Indonesia
  2. Syiah Kuala University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Soil Science, Banda Aceh, Indonesia
  3. Syiah Kuala University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Banda Aceh, Indonesia
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Abstract

The paper concerns the transformation of water resources induced by the construction and functioning of the Brest Fortress defence structure and presents the current water resources resulting from these changes. The study was conducted by analysing historical materials: maps, plans and written documents. Hydrographic changes were analysed for five study periods covering almost 200 years, from 1823, presenting the hydrographic network before the construction of fortifications, up to 2018, when most of these structures ceased or were repurposed. Hydrographic changes were analysed in detail for the area of the Terespol Fortification. The analysis revealed that almost 80% of the wetland area had disappeared after intensive drainage works, and several dozen originally small and isolated areas had been incorporated into a vast drainage network. One of the consequences of these activities was the creation of significantly transformed artificial catchments within the study area.
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Authors and Affiliations

Katarzyna Mięsiak-Wójcik
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Institute of Earth and Environmental Science, Kraśnicka Av. 2D, 20-718 Lublin, Poland
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Abstract

The presence of natural organic matter (NOM) in water has a significant influence on water treatment processes. Water industries around the world consider coagulation/flocculation to be one of the main water treatment methods. The chief objective of conventional coagulation-based processes is to reduce the turbidity of the water and to remove natural organic matter (NOM) present in solutions. The aim of this paper is to present some developments in terms of improved coagulation for the drinking water of Sidi Yacoub treatment plant located in the Northwest of Algeria.
The experiments involved studying the effects of the application of two coagulants (ferric chloride and aluminium sulphate) on the removal of turbidity and natural organic matter from water by measuring the chemical oxygen demand ( COD) and the UV absorbance at 254 nm. The results showed that the rate of turbidity removal increased from 81.3% to 88% when ferric chloride was applied and from 89.91% to 94% when aluminium sulphate was applied. For NOM removal, the maximum removal rates of COD and UV254 were 48% and 52%, respectively, in the case of ferric chloride. These rates increased to 59% and 65% after optimised coagulation. When aluminium sulphate was used, the rate of removal in water increased from 43% to 55% for COD and from 47% to 59% for UV254 after optimised coagulation. The combination of the two coagulants at equal dosage shows a slight improvement in the values obtained after optimisation, both in terms of turbidity and the NOM.
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Authors and Affiliations

Taieb Hadbi
1
ORCID: ORCID
Saaed Hamoudi Abdelamir
2

  1. University of Science and Technology Mohamed Boudiaf of Oran, Faculty of Architecture and Civil Engineering, El Mnaouar, BP 1505, Bir El Djir 31000, Oran, Algeria
  2. Hassiba Benbouali University of Chlef, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Chlef, Algeria
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Abstract

The drought ranked first in terms the natural hazard characteristics and impacts followed by tropical cyclones, regional floods, earthquakes, and volcanoes. Drought monitoring is an important aspect of drought risk management and the assessment of drought is usually done through using various drought indices. The western region in Algeria is the most affected by the drought since the middle of the 70s.The current research focuses on the analysis and comparison of four meteorological drought indices (standardized precipitation index – SPI, percent of normal index – PN, decile index – DI, and rainfall anomaly index – RAI) in the Tafna basin for different time scales (annual, seasonal, and monthly) during 1979–2011. The results showed that the SPI and DI have similar frequencies for dry and wet categories. The RAI and PN were able to detect more drought categories. Meanwhile, all indices have strong positive correlations between each other, especially with Spearman correlation tests (0.99; 1.0), the meteorological drought indices almost showed consistent and similar results in the study area. It was determined in 1982 as the driest year and 2008 as the wettest year in the period of the study. The analysis of the trend was based on the test of Mann– Kendall (MK), a positive trend of the indices were detected on a monthly scale, this increasing of indices trend represent the increasing of the wet categories which explains the increasing trend of the rainfall in the last 2000s. These results overview of the understanding of drought trends in the region is crucial for making strategies and assist in decision making for water resources management and reducing vulnerability to drought.
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Authors and Affiliations

Hanane Bougara
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
Kamila Baba Hamed
1
Christian Borgemeister
3
ORCID: ORCID
Bernhard Tischbein
3
ORCID: ORCID
Navneet Kumar
3
ORCID: ORCID

  1. University of Abou Bekr Belkaid, Faculty of Technology, Tlemcen BP 230 - 13000, Chetouane Tlemcen, Algeria
  2. Pan African University Institute of Water and Energy Sciences (PAUWES), Tlemcen, Algeria
  3. University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF), Bonn, Germany
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Abstract

Municipal solid waste collection points (MSWCPs) are places where residents of municipalities can leave their waste free of charge. MSWCPs should operate in every municipality in Poland. The Geographic Information System (GIS) and analytical hierarchy process (AHP) were used in conjunction as tools to determine potential locations of MSWCPs. Due to possible social conflicts related to the location of MSWCPs, three variants of buffer zones for a residential area were adopted. As a result of the spatial analysis carried out using the GIS software, 247 potential locations were identified in variant no. 1 (which accounted for 7.1% of commune area), 167 for variant no. 2 (6.3% of commune area), and 88 for variant no. 3 (3.8% of commune area). The most favourable locations for MSWCPs were determined using the AHP method with additional criteria for which weights were calculated as follows: the area of a designated plot (0.045), actual designation of a plot in the local spatial development plan (0.397), distance from the centre of the village (0.096) and the commune (0.231), and population density of a village (0.231). The highest weights (over 50%) in the AHP analysis were obtained for 12 locations in variant no. 3, two of which had an area over 3 ha. The adopted methodology enabled to identify quasi-optimal solutions for MSWCP locations in the analysed rural commune. This research has the potential to influence future waste management policies by assisting stakeholders in the MSWCP location.
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Authors and Affiliations

Mateusz Malinowski
1
ORCID: ORCID
Sylwia Guzdek
2
ORCID: ORCID
Agnieszka Petryk
3
ORCID: ORCID
Klaudia Tomaszek
4
ORCID: ORCID

  1. University of Agriculture in Cracow, Department of Bioprocesses Engineering, Energetics and Automatization, ul. Balicka 116b, 30-149 Kraków, Poland
  2. Cracow University of Economics, Department of Microeconomics, Kraków, Poland
  3. Cracow University of Economics, Department of Spatial Management, Kraków, Poland
  4. University of Agriculture in Cracow, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Agrophysics, Kraków, Poland
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Abstract

Multiple anthropogenic agents have turned Lake Maracaibo into a hypereutrophic environment. Heavy metals resulting from the steel and oil industry augment pollution in the lake. There is a lack of research on the ecotoxicological effect of heavy metals in protozoa. To evaluate the ecotoxicological effect of Cr3+, Cr6+, Cd2+, Pb2+ and Ni2+ on free-living ciliated protozoa and to identify suitable ciliated protozoa candidates for bioindicators of water quality; we estimated the lethal concentration for 50% of the protozoa population (LC50) in samples from two stations (S1: narrow of Maracaibo and S2: South of the lake) using ecotoxicological tests in the Sedgewick–Rafter chamber and Probit analysis. The general toxicity patterns obtained for S1 protozoa (Euplotes sp. and Oxytricha sp.) were Cr3+ > Cd2+ > Pb2+ > Cr6+ > Ni2+; and those corresponding to S2 (Coleps sp. and Chilodonella sp.) were Cr6+ > Cr3+ > Cd2+ > Pb2+ > Ni2+. We found statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) in the LC50 of protozoa exposed to Cr3+, Cr6+, Ni2+ and Pb2+ when comparing the two sampling stations. The differences observed in toxicity patterns are probably the result of various kinds of protozoa adaptation, possibly induced by various sources, levels and incidents of exposure to heavy metals contamination of the protozoa studied and to the physicochemical conditions prevailing in the two selected stations. The levels of tolerance observed in the present study, allow us to infer that S2 ciliates are the most susceptible to the contaminants studied and can be used as possible microbiological indicators that provide early warning in studies of contamination by heavy metals in Lake Maracaibo.
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Authors and Affiliations

Fernando Luis Castro Echavez
1
Julio César Marín Leal
2

  1. University of La Guajira, Faculty of Engineering, Environmental Engineering Program, PICHIHÜEL Research group, km 5 vía a Maicao, 440002, Riohacha, Colombia
  2. University of Zulia, Faculty of Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Department of Sanitary and Environmental Engineering (DISA), Maracaibo, Venezuela
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Abstract

In the discussion of water quality control, the first and most effective parameter that affects other variables and water quality parameters is the temperature situation and water temperature parameters that control many ecological and chemical processes in reservoirs. Additionally, one of the most important quality parameters studied in the quality of water resources of dams and reservoirs is the study of water quality in terms of salinity. The salinity of the reservoirs is primarily due to the rivers leading into them. The control of error in the reservoirs is always considered because the outlet water of the reservoirs, depending on the type of consumption, should always be standard in terms of salinity. Therefore, in this study, using the available statistics, the Ce-Qual-W2 two-dimensional model was used to simulate the heat and salinity layering of the Latyan Dam reservoir. The results showed that with warming and shifting from spring to late summer, the slope of temperature changes at depth increases and thermal layering intensifies, and a severe temperature difference occurs at depth. The results of sensitivity analysis also showed that by decreasing the wind shear coefficient (WSC), the reservoir water temperature increases, so that by increasing or decreasing the value of this coefficient by 0.4, the average water temperature by 0.56°C changes inversely, and the results also show that by increasing or decreasing the value of the shade coefficient by 0.85, the average water temperature changes by about 7.62°C, directly.
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Authors and Affiliations

Tzu-Chia Chen
1
ORCID: ORCID
Shu-Yan Yu
1
Chang-Ming Wang
1
Sen Xie
1
Hanif Barazandeh
2

  1. International College, Krirk University, Bangkok, 3 Ram Inthra Rd, Khwaeng Anusawari, Khet Bang Khen, Krung Thep Maha Nakhon 10220, Thailand
  2. Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran
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Abstract

Agricultural biogas plants are not only a place for processing waste resulting from animal husbandry, but also for generating electricity and heat as well as organic fertiliser. In a four-year experiment, pellets were used as organic fertiliser in the establishment of an experiment with fast-growing oxytrees. The study aimed to investigate the growth and stem thickness increment, overwintering in the first and subsequent years of cultivation under the conditions of north-eastern Poland.
The dried digestate and the pellets made from it were characterised by a high content of macroelements (N – 1,95%, P2O5 – 1,1%, K2O – 1,3%). The applied pellet from an agricultural biogas plant under oxytree seedlings due to its slow decomposition had a good effect on the growth of oxytrees in the second and third years. The average growth of oxytrees in the second year was 209.7 cm, and in the third year, 246.8 cm. The growth of oxytrees fertilised with pellets made from the digestate of an agricultural biogas plant was 13% higher than that of trees growing on the control strip.
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Authors and Affiliations

Zbigniew Skibko
1
ORCID: ORCID
Waclaw Romaniuk
2
ORCID: ORCID
Andrzej Borusiewicz
3
ORCID: ORCID
Henryk Porwisiak
3
ORCID: ORCID
Janusz Lisowski
3
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Bialystok University of Technology, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Wiejska 45 D, 15-351 Bialystok, Poland
  2. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Insitute, Falenty, Poland
  3. The Higher School of Agribusiness in Lomza, Poland
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Abstract

The 2150 km2 transboundary Gurara Reservoir Catchment in Nigeria was modelled using the Water Evaluation and Planning tool to assess the hydro-climatic variability resulting from climate change and human-induced activities from 1989 to 2019 and projected to the future till 2050. Specifically, the model simulated the historic dataset and predicted the future runoff. The initial results revealed that monthly calibration/validation of the model yielded acceptable results with Nash–Sutcliff efficiency ( NSE), percent bias ( PBIAS), and coefficient of determination (R2) values of 0.72/0.69, 0.72/0.67 and 4.0%/1.0% respectively. Uncertainty was moderately adequate as the model enveloped about 70% of the observed runoff. Future predicted runoffs were modelled for climate ensembles under three different representative concentration pathways (RCP4.5, RCP6.5 and RCP8.5). The RCP projections for all the climate change scenarios showed increasing runoff trends. The model proved efficient in determining the hydrological response of the catchment to potential impacts from climate change and human-induced activities. The model has the potential to be used for further analysis to aid effective water resources planning and management at catchment scale.
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Authors and Affiliations

Francis Ifie-emi Oseke
1
ORCID: ORCID
Geophery Kwame Anornu
1
Kwaku Amaning Adjei
1
ORCID: ORCID
Martin Obada Eduvie
1

  1. National Water Resources Institute, Mando, P.MB 2309, Kaduna, Nigeria
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Abstract

This study aims to investigate how grazing is perceived across the Curvature Subcarpathians (Romania) by farmers. We investigate farmers’ attitudes toward and understanding of grazing practice and associated processes involving small ruminants (sheep and goats). Additionally, we review the scientific literature and new discussions about grazing vs overgrazing terms and changes in the Romanian small ruminant livestock. Results of the survey on the total of 101 case studies from villages in 3 counties (Damboviţa, Buzau, and Vrancea) show that: (i) grazing is differently perceived; (ii) most of the areas designated for grazing are located near riverbanks (over 55%); most of the respondents reported that the areas intended for grazing are quite close to the inhabited areas; distances are less than 2.5 km; and over 60% of respondents believe that the areas are continuously subject to soil degradation processes; (iii) answers given in connection with the issues addressed provide both relevance to the Curvature Subcarpathians (6792 km2) and the potential impact of higher pressure of grazing on local areas due to the discouragement of specific transhumance policies (more than 60% required subsidies). The average stocking density is about 4.7 head per ha. In general, beyond different farmers’ perceptions, a scientific question remains open regarding the quantitative impact of grazing on hydrological processes. Hence, a field survey (e.g., rainfall-runoff experiments) to assess grazing pressure on water and soil resources will be performed.
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Authors and Affiliations

Gianina Neculau
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
Gabriel Minea
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
Nicu Ciobotaru
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
Gabriela Ioana-Toroimac
3
ORCID: ORCID
Sevastel Mircea
1
ORCID: ORCID
Oana Mititelu-Ionuș
4
ORCID: ORCID
Jesús Rodrigo-Comino
5
ORCID: ORCID

  1. University of Bucharest, Research Institute of the University of Bucharest, 90 Panduri Street, Sector 5, 050107, Bucharest, Romania
  2. National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, 97 E Bucureşti – Ploieşti Road, Sector 1, 013686, Bucharest, Romania
  3. University of Bucharest, Faculty of Geography, Bucharest, Romania
  4. University of Craiova, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Geography, Craiova, Romania
  5. University of Granada, Faculty of Philosophy and Letters, Department of Regional Geographic Analysis and Physical Geography, Granada, Spain
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Abstract

Ethiopia has lost sizable forest resources due to rapid population growth and subsequent increase in the demand for agricultural land and fuel woods. In this study, GIS and remote sensing techniques were used to detect forest cover changes in relation to climate variability in the Kafa zone, southwest Ethiopia. Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images of 1986 and 1990, Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) image of 2010 and Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI-8) image of 2018 were acquired at a resolution of 30 m to investigate spatial-temporal forest cover and land use changes. A supervised image classification was made using a maximum likelihood method in ERDAS imagine V9.2 to identify the various land use and land cover classes. Both spectral (normalised difference vegetation index – NDVI) and post classification change detection methods were used to determine the forest cover changes. To examine the extent and rate of forest cover changes, post classification comparisons were made using ArcGIS V 10.4.1. A net forest cover change of 1168.65 ha (12%) was detected during the study period from 1986 to 2018. The drop in the NDVI from 0.06–0.64 in 1986 to (–0.08)–0.12 in 2018 indicated a marked forest cover change in the study area. The correlation of NDVI values with climate data indicated the forest was not in a stable condition. The declining of the forest cover was most likely caused by climate variability in the study area.
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Authors and Affiliations

Dejene Beyene Lemma
1
Kinde Teshome Gebretsadik
1
Seifu Kebede Debela
1

  1. Jimma Institute of Technology, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Jimma University, Jimma, P.O.Box: 378, Ethiopia
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Abstract

The present study was to reflect the use of some bacteria in the treatment and removal of pollutants in three selected wastewater sites, including a vegetable oil plant (viz. Al-Etihad Food Industries), the main wastewater treatment station in the city of Hila, and Al-Hila River water from October 2019 to January 2020. The bacterial isolates identified in these three sites were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacteria cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Thalasobacillus devorans, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Bacillus subtilis. The molecular study of the bacterial isolates involved the detection of bacterial genera using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The results showed that water had a variable nature, depending on the substances in it. It recorded varying chemical and physical property values, ranging between 6.36 and 7.82 for pH and from 2500 to 7100 mg∙dm–3 for total alkalinity. Additional values were 713–2051 μS∙cm–1 for electrical conductivity (EC), 5.90–9.80 mg∙dm–3 for chemical oxygen demand (COD), and 480–960 mg∙dm–3 for total hardness. The given values were also 0.20–0.65 μg∙dm–3, 0.03-0.23 μg∙dm–3, and 0–107 mg∙dm–3 for nitrite (NO2), phosphate (PO4) oils, respectively.
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Authors and Affiliations

Hanan Kareem Salim
1
ORCID: ORCID
Suad Ghali Kadhim Al-Ahmed
1

  1. Babylon University, College of Sciences, Department of Biology, PO Box: 4 Iraq - Babylon - Hilla, Iraq
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Abstract

The marshes are the most abundant water sources and ecological rich communities. They have a significant impact on the ecological and economic well-being of the communities surrounding them. However, climatic changes directly impact these bodies of water, especially those marshes which depend on rainwater and flooding for their survival. The Al-Sannya marsh is used as the example of marshes in Southern Iraq for this study between 1987–2017. The research takes place throughout the winter season due to the revival of marshes in southern Iraq at this time of year. The years 1987, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2007, 2014, 2017 are the focus of this study. Satellite imagery from the Landsat 5 (TM) and Landsat 8 (OLI) and the meteorological parameters affecting the marsh were acquired from NASA. The calculation of the areas of water bodies after classification using satellite imagery is done using the maximum likelihood method and comparing it with meteorological parameters. These results showed that these marshes are facing extinction due to the general change of climate and the interference of humans in utilising the drylands of the marsh for agricultural purposes. The vegetation area can be seen to have decreased from 51.15 km2 in 2000 to 8.77 km2 in 2017.
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Authors and Affiliations

Amal Jabbar Hatem
1
Ali Adnan N. Al-Jasim
1
ORCID: ORCID
Hameed Majeed Abduljabbar
1

  1. University of Baghdad, College of Education for Pure Science (Ibn-Al-Haitham), Department of Physics, Baghdad, Iraq
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Abstract

The article is devoted to a topical scientific problem in modern conditions – valuation of land in Ukraine. The imperfection of the existing approaches requires further research on the changing conditions of land use and their impact on land pricing.
A methodology for determining the market value of reclaimed land based on a differentiated assessment of its productivity through crop yields is proposed, taking into account natural and climatic zones and other conditions of a particular region. The basis of the methodology is the application of long-term forecast and a set of forecast and simulation models, in particular the model of area climatic conditions and the model of water regime and water regulation technologies on reclaimed land. At that the crop yield model as a complex multiplicative type model takes into account all main factors influencing crop yield formation: weather, climatic and soil conditions, cultivation techniques, water regime of reclaimed land, etc.
The proposed approaches were tested by the method of large – scale machine experiment using a land plot in the zone of Western Polissya of Ukraine as the example. The obtained results indicate that there is a differentiation in land value, which is a proportional derivative of the yield of cultivated crops depending on the conditions of their cultivation. The variation range of the studied indicators in relative form by the ratio of maximum and minimum values to the weighted average value is for cultivated crops – 393%, and for the above soils – 44.6%. Thus, within one object, the estimated value of land in view of available soils and cultivated crops varies from USD2456∙ha–1 to USD4005 ∙ ha–1, averaging USD3522 ∙ ha–1.
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Authors and Affiliations

Anatoliy Rokochinskiy
1
ORCID: ORCID
Pavlo Volk
1
ORCID: ORCID
Nadia Frolenkova
1
ORCID: ORCID
Olha Tykhenko
2
ORCID: ORCID
Sergiy Shalai
1
ORCID: ORCID
Ruslan Tykhenko
2
ORCID: ORCID
Ivan Openko
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
  2. National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Str. Vasylkivska, 17, 03040, Kyiv, Ukraine
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Abstract

Unlike many other countries, tropical regions such as Indonesia still lack publications on pedotransfer functions (PTFs), particularly ones dedicated to the predicting of soil bulk density. Soil bulk density affects soil density, porosity, water holding capacity, drainage, and the stock and flux of nutrients in the soil. However, obtaining access to a laboratory is difficult, time-consuming, and costly. Therefore, it is necessary to utilise PTFs to estimate soil bulk density. This study aims to define soil properties related to soil bulk density, develop new PTFs using multiple linear regression (MLR), and evaluate the performance and accuracy of PTFs (new and existing). Seven existing PTFs were applied in this study. For the purposes of evaluation, Pearson’s correlation (r), mean error (ME), root mean square error (RMSE), and modelling efficiency (EF) were used. The study was conducted in five soil types on Bintan Island, Indonesia. Soil depth and organic carbon (SOC) are soil properties potentially relevant for soil bulk density prediction. The ME, RMSE, and EF values were lower for the newly developed PTFs than for existing PTFs. In summary, we concluded that the newly developed PTFs have higher accuracy than existing PTFs derived from literature. The prediction of soil bulk density will be more accurate if PTFs are applied directly in the area that is to be studied.
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Authors and Affiliations

Evi Dwi Yanti
1
ORCID: ORCID
Asep Mulyono
1
ORCID: ORCID
Muhamad Rahman Djuwansah
1
ORCID: ORCID
Ida Narulita
1
ORCID: ORCID
Risandi Dwirama Putra
2
ORCID: ORCID
Dewi Surinati
3
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Research Center for Geotechnology, Indonesian National Research and Innovation Agency, Bandung, Indonesia
  2. Maritim Raja Ali Haji University, Tanjung Pinang, Indonesia
  3. Research Center for Oceanography, Indonesian National Research and Innovation Agency, Jakarta, Indonesia
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Abstract

The aim of the study was to assess the P-PO4 and N-NH4 pollution of water in grasslands located on peat soils and to identify the impact of groundwater level on this pollution formation. The research was conducted in 2000– 2010 on grounds of ITP-PIB in Biebrza village (Poland). Within lowland fen a total of 18 monitoring points of groundwater and watercourses were established in 6 separate test stands. The subject of the research was water collected from drainage ditches/channels and groundwater, which was taken from wells installed in organic-soil layer and wells whose bottom was 15–20 cm below this layer. Water samples were collected several times a year, and in the case of groundwater, its level was also measured. It was found that: 1) due to concentration level of P-PO4 and N-NH4, about 46 and 39% of water samples from organic-soil layer and more than 40 and 37% of water samples from mineral- organic-soil layer respectively, were characterized by poor chemical status; 2) due to the exceeding of the limit values of P-PO4 and N-NH4 concentration, water samples from watercourses in over 30 and 27% respectively were not within 1st and 2nd class of surface water quality; 3) P-PO4 and N-NH4 concentrations in each water type were statistically significant and positively correlated with each other; 4) in organic-soil layer the groundwater level changing every 10 cm was a statistically significant factor differentiating the average P-PO4 concentration in groundwater associated with mineral-organic layer of peat soil and average N-NH4 concentration in each type of water.
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Authors and Affiliations

Andrzej Sapek
1
Stefan Pietrzak
2
ORCID: ORCID
Dominika Juszkowska
2
ORCID: ORCID
Marek Urbaniak
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Retired researcher
  2. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, 3 Hrabska Avenue, 05-090, Falenty, Poland
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Abstract

According to the SRES A1B climate change scenario, by the end of the 21st century temperature in Poland will increase by 2–4°C, no increase in precipitation totals is predicted. This will rise crop irrigation needs and necessity to develop irrigation systems. Due to increase in temperature and needs of sustainable agriculture development some changes in crop growing structure will occur. An increase interest in high protein crops cultivation has been noted last years and further extension of these acreage is foreseen. Identifying the future water needs of these plants is crucial for planning and implementing sustainable agricultural production. In the study, the impact of projected air temperature changes on soybean water needs, one of the most valuable high-protein crops, in 2021–2050 in the Kuyavia region in Poland was analysed. The calculations based on meteorological data collected in 1981–2010 were considered as the reference period. Potential evapotranspiration was adopted as a measure of crop water requirements. The potential evapotranspiration was estimated using the Penman–Monteith method and crop coefficient. Based on these estimations, it was found that in the forecast years the soybean water needs will increase by 5% in the growing period (from 21 April to 10 September), and by 8% in June–August. The highest monthly soybean water needs increase (by 15%) may occur in August. The predicted climate changes and the increase in the arable crops water requirements, may contribute to an increase in the irrigated area in the Kuyavia region and necessity of rational management of water resources.
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Authors and Affiliations

Wiesława Kasperska-Wołowicz
1
ORCID: ORCID
Stanisław Rolbiecki
2
ORCID: ORCID
Hicran A. Sadan
2
ORCID: ORCID
Roman Rolbiecki
2
ORCID: ORCID
Barbara Jagosz
3
ORCID: ORCID
Piotr Stachowski
4
ORCID: ORCID
Daniel Liberacki
4
ORCID: ORCID
Tymoteusz Bolewski
1
ORCID: ORCID
Piotr Prus
5
ORCID: ORCID
Ferenc Pal-Fam
6
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Hrabska Av. 3, Falenty, 05-090 Raszyn, Poland
  2. Bydgoszcz University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Department of Agrometeorology, Plant Irrigation and Horticulture, Bydgoszcz, Poland
  3. University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Biotechnology and Horticulture, Department of Plant Biology and Biotechnology, Krakow, Poland
  4. Poznan University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Engineering and Mechanical Engineering, Department of Land Improvement, Environmental Development and Spatial Management, Poznań, Poland
  5. Bydgoszcz University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Laboratory of Economics and Agribusiness Advisory, Bydgoszcz, Poland
  6. Hungarian University of Agriculture and Life Sciences (MATE), Kaposvár, Hungary
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Abstract

In recent years, a growing problem of water deficit has been observed, which is particularly acute for agriculture. To alleviate the effects of drought, hydrogel soil additives – superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) – can be helpful.
The primary objective of this article was to present a comparison of the advantages resulting from the application of synthetic or natural hydrogels in agriculture. The analysis of the subject was carried out based on 129 articles published between 1992 and 2020. In the article, the advantages of the application of hydrogel products in order to improve soil quality, and crop growth.
Both kinds of soil amendments (synthetic and natural) similarly improve the yield of crops. In the case of natural origin polymers, a lower cost of preparation and a shorter time of biodegradation are indicated as the main advantage in comparison to synthetic polymers, and greater security for the environment.
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Authors and Affiliations

Beata Grabowska-Polanowska
1
ORCID: ORCID
Tomasz Garbowski
1
ORCID: ORCID
Dominika Bar-Michalczyk
1
ORCID: ORCID
Agnieszka Kowalczyk
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Hrabska Av. 3, 09-090 Raszyn, Poland
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Abstract

Changing atmospheric conditions, including above all the deepening extreme weather phenomena, are increasing from year to year. This, in consequence, causes an increase in the incidence of low outflows.
The study compares low water levels for two catchments: Biała Woda and Czarna Woda, and phosphorus and nitrogen load using the Nutrient Delivery Ratio (NDR) model in InVEST software. The objective of the NDR is to map nutrient sources from catchment area and transfer to the river bed. The nutrient loads (nitrogen and phosphorus) spread across the landscape are determined based on a land use (LULC) map and associated loading rates described in literature. The studies have shown that low water levels have been more common recently and pose the greatest threat to the biological life in the aquatic ecosystems. The structure of land use is also of great importance, with a significant impact on the runoff and nitrogen and phosphorus load. Phosphorus and runoff from surface sources to the water of Biała Woda and Czarna Woda catchments area has been reduced in forested areas. Only higher run-offs are observed in the residential buildings zone. The nitrogen load was also greater in the lower (estuary) parts of both catchments, where residential buildings dominate.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marek T. Kopacz
1
ORCID: ORCID
Zbigniew Kowalewski
1
ORCID: ORCID
Luis Santos
2
Robert Mazur
1
ORCID: ORCID
Vasco Lopes
3
Agnieszka Kowalczyk
4
ORCID: ORCID
Dominika Bar-Michalczyk
4
ORCID: ORCID

  1. AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering, Mickiewicza 30, 30-059, Kraków, Poland
  2. Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, Departamento Arqueologia, Conservação e Restauro e Património, Portugal
  3. Polytechnic Institute of Tomar, School of Technology, Portugal
  4. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Hrabska Av. 3, 09-090 Raszyn, Poland
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Abstract

Models describe our beliefs about how the world functions. In mathematical modelling, we translate those beliefs into the language of mathematics. Mathematical models can yield prognose on the base of applied fertiliser dose. In this work results of finding yield mathematical model according to fertiliser (nitrogen) dose for perennials (willowleaf sunflower Helianthus salicifolious, cup plant Silphium perfoliatum and Jerusalem artichoke Helianthus tuberosus) on marginal land are presented. Models were described as normalised square equations for dependence between yield and fertiliser doses. Experiments were conducted in lisymeters and vases for willowleaf sunflower and cup plant. For Jerusalem artichoke experiments were done in vases only. All experiments have been doing during two years (2018 and 2019) for different fertilisers doses (45, 90 and 135 kg N∙ha–1) in three repetitions. From simulations maximal yield could be achieved for following fertiliser doses – willowleaf sunflower 104 kg N∙ha–1, cup plant 85 kg N∙ha–1 and Jerusalem artichoke 126 kg N∙ha–1.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marek Hryniewicz
1
ORCID: ORCID
Maria Strzelczyk
1
ORCID: ORCID
Marek Helis
1
ORCID: ORCID
Anna Paszkiewicz-Jasińska
1
ORCID: ORCID
Aleksandra Steinhoff-Wrzesniewska
1
ORCID: ORCID
Kamil Roman
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Hrabska Av. 3, 09-090 Raszyn, Poland
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Abstract

Permanent grasslands are the most environment-friendly way of using agricultural lands. Apart from producing fodder, grasslands play many other important non-productive functions. Biodiversity is the key factor decisive for their high natural and productive values. Grasslands play an important role in water retention. Not all types of grasslands may be used agriculturally. Out of 16 types of habitats, 10 may be used for production, the others are biologically valuable. The surface area of permanent grasslands in Poland has markedly decreased during the last decade. Now, they constitute slightly more than 20% of agricultural lands occupying 3127.8 thous. ha (in 2019) including 2764 thous. ha of meadows and 363.8 thous. ha of pastures.
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Authors and Affiliations

Mirosław Gabryszuk
1
ORCID: ORCID
Jerzy Barszczewski
1
ORCID: ORCID
Barbara Wróbel
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Hrabska Av. 3, 05-090 Raszyn, Poland
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Abstract

There were done simulations of fuels consumption in the system of electrical energy and heat production based on modernised GTD-350 turbine engine with the use of OGLST programme. In intention the system based on GTD-350 engine could be multifuel system which utilise post-fying vegetable oil, micronised biomass, sludge, RDF and fossil fuels as backup fuels. These fuels have broad spectrum of LHV fuel value from 6 (106 J·kg-1) (e.g. for sludge) to 46 (106 J·kg-1) (for a fuel equivalent with similar LHV as propan) and were simulations scope. Simulation results showed non linear dependence in the form of power function between unitary fuel mass consumption of simulated engine GTD-350 needed to production of 1 kWh electrical energy and LHV fuel value (106 J·kg-1). In this dependence a constant 14.648 found in simulations was multiplied by LHV raised to power –0.875. The R2 determination coefficient between data and determined function was 0.9985. Unitary fuel mass consumption varied from 2.911 (kg·10–3·W–1·h–1) for 6 (106 J·kg-1) LHV to 0.502 (kg·10–3·W–1·h–1) for 46 (106 J·kg-1) LHV. There was assumed 7,000 (h) work time per year and calculated fuels consumption for this time. Results varied from 4,311.19 (103 kg) for a fuel with 6 (106 J·kg-1) LHV to 743.46 (103 kg) for a fuel with 46 (106 J·kg-1) LHV. The system could use fuels mix and could be placed in containers and moved between biomass wastes storages placed in many different places located on rural areas or local communities.
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Authors and Affiliations

Marek Hryniewicz
1
ORCID: ORCID
Kamil Roman
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Hrabska Av. 3, 09-090 Raszyn, Poland
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Abstract

The paper presents the concept and deployment of the agro-hydro-meteorological monitoring system (abbrev. AgHMM) created for the purposes of operational planning of regulated drainage and irrigation on the scale of a drainage/irrigation system (INOMEL project). Monitoring system involved regular daily (weekly readings) measurements of agrometeorological and hydrological parameters in water courses at melioration object during vegetation seasons. The measurement results enable an assessment of the meteorological conditions, moisture changes in the 0-60 cm soil profile, fluctuations of groundwater levels at quarters and testing points, also water levels in ditches and at dam structures, and water flow in water courses. These data were supplemended by 7-day meteorological forecast parameter predictions, served as input data for a model of operational planning of drainage and subirrigation at the six melioration systems in Poland. In addition, it was carried out irregular remote sensing observations of plant condition, water consumption by plants and soil moisture levels using imagery taken by unmanned aerial vehicles and Sentinel’s satellites. All the collected data was used for support operational activities aimed at maintaining optimal soil moisture for plant growth and should to provide farmers with high and stable yields. An example of the practical operations using the AgHMM system in 2019 is shown on the basis of the subirrigation object at permanent grasslands located in central Poland called “Czarny Rów B1”.
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Authors and Affiliations

Ewa Kanecka-Geszke
1
ORCID: ORCID
Bogdan Bąk
1
ORCID: ORCID
Tymoteusz Bolewski
1
ORCID: ORCID
Edmund Kaca
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Hrabska Av. 3, Falenty, 05-090 Raszyn, Poland
  2. Warsaw University of Life Sciences (SGGW), Institute of Environmental Engineering, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
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Abstract

Human activities in relation to aquatic ecosystems result in significant economic losses in the form of contamination of water sources, deteriorating its quality and therefore its availability in lakes, water bodies and even in soil. Hence the need for systematic revitalisation or reclamation of water ecosystems. Such actions, in order to be rational, require a detailed understanding of the causes, and then the use of appropriate technology. The need for the above-mentioned actions result from the weather changes that have been noticeable in recent years, as well as environmental pollutants increasing water eutrophication in reservoirs and stimulating the development of some species of cyanobacteria. These cyanobacteria can cause serious water poisoning, especially in water supply systems. Therefore, a rational, comprehensive technology for the removal of bottom sediments and their processing into organic and mineral fertiliser has been developed with properties similar to manure. It also creates opportunities to improve the structure of soils thanks to the supply of organic carbon, the loss of which was found, among others, in also in soils of Poland and EU. These new possibilities of revitalisation hitherto unknown make it possible to a large extent, compliance with environmental requirements when revitalising water reservoirs and soil.
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Authors and Affiliations

Kamila Mazur
1
ORCID: ORCID
Andrzej Eymontt
1
ORCID: ORCID
Krzysztof Wierzbicki
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Hrabska Av. 3, 05-090 Raszyn, Poland
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Abstract

Smart farming is about managing a farm using modern information and communication techniques in order to increase the efficiency and quality of plant and animal production and to optimise human labour inputs. It is an inseparable part of a sustainable agricultural economy, where energy-saving and low-emission solutions are of particular importance, e.g. in livestock construction. Animal buildings are one of the main building elements of a farm. The paper presents the use of modern solutions that may result in lower energy consumption, and thus lower operating costs of the building. They also reduce the consumption of natural resources and the emission of pollutants, and ensure animal welfare and safety of the operators’ work. Rational use of energy depends, among others, on from the used insulation materials for the construction of livestock buildings, technical equipment, i.e. lighting, heating, ventilation, as well as zootechnical devices. The profitability of livestock production can also be supported by the use of solar, wind, water and biomass energy. Photovoltaic cells, solar collectors, wind turbines, heat pumps and agricultural biogas plants are used for this purpose.
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Authors and Affiliations

Anna M. Bartkowiak
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Hrabska Av. 3, 05-090 Raszyn
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Abstract

Nowadays, in order to ensure high quality of municipal services, and thus a high quality of life for the local community, the authorities of both the basic local government unit and managers of municipal enterprises must strive to maintain high standards of sustainable development. The level of quality of life and services provided can be determined by various dimensions, such as: ecological environment, housing conditions, ecological production in the field of consumer goods, balance between built-up areas and green areas, care for agricultural areas, limiting the deepening social stratification, rational economy water or rational waste management. Therefore, the paper presents a theoretical analysis of the main directions of sustainable development in the activities of municipal enterprises.
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Authors and Affiliations

Piotr Bartkowiak
1
ORCID: ORCID
Anna M. Bartkowiak
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Poznan University of Economics and Business, Department of Investments and Real Estate, Niepodległości Av. 10, 61-875 Poznań, Poland
  2. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Hrabska Av. 3, 05-090 Raszyn

Instructions for authors

Authors should submit manuscripts via the Editorial Board ( Editorial system - Submit Your Manuscript )


1. "Journal of Water and Land Development” is published four times a year in English, articles are followed by a short (not exceeding 200 words) summary in Polish.
2. Conciseness of style is a prequisite, avoid verbose phrases and abvious statements. Manuscript should not exceed 1 printing sheet (20 standard pages of 1800 characters per page). Tables, figures and short summary should be typed at the end of the paper on separate pages.
3. Each article should contain the following elements: title, name and surname of the author(s), authors' affiliation, short abstract no longer than 150–200 words, key words, text of the paper divided into Introduction, Material and Methods, Results and Discussion, References (arranged in alphabetic order as shown below) and summary in Polish BENCALA K.E., WALTERS R.A. 1983. Simulation of solute transport in mountain pool-and riffle stream: a transient storage model. Water Resources Research. Vol. 19 p. 718–724. GÓRECKI A. 1987. Rozpoznanie i opis sztucznych pól odniesień przestrzennych [Recognition and description of the artificial plots of spatial relations]. Manuscript. Wrocław. Uniwersytet Wrocławski pp. 18. JANKOWSKI M. 2006. Elementy grafiki komputerowej [Elements of the computer graphics]. Warszawa. WNT. ISBN 8320431638 pp. 220. STRZELECKI T. 1994. Rola systemów informacji geograficznej w zarządzaniu państwem, województwem i gminą. W: Komputerowe wspomaganie badań naukowych [The role of GIS in the management of the state, voivodship and community. In: Computer aided research]. I Konferencja Środowiskowa. Wrocław. Wrocławskie Towarzystwo Naukowe p. 19–25. Papers referred to should be quoted in the text as KOWALSKI [1997], [KOWALSKI, NOWAK 1997]. If there are more than two authors, please add et al. after the first name i.e. NOWAK et al. [1997]. English version of the non-congress language title should be added in brackets.
4. Figures should be draw on tracing paper or delivered as laser printouts. Legends in the graphs should be restricted to numerical and letter descriptions, other explanations should be placed in the figure caption. Descriptions remaining within the graph should be in English and of the proportional size (i.e. they must ensure readability after graph size reduction).
5. Tables should fit to the width (16 cm) and height (24 cm) of the column.
6. Data illustrated in Figures should not appear in Tables and vice versa.
7. All variables in equations and in the text should be written in italic. Use SI units in the form g·cm–3 and not g/ml.
8. Manuscript should be sent in three copies with tables, graphs and English abstract and Polish summary with title and key words on separate pages. Enclose a floppy disc with the text written in Word for Windows with tables and figures saved in separate files.

Template
Use the article template to format your article - TEMPLATE.pdf or TEMPLATE.docx

Similarity Check Plagiarism Screening System
The editorial board is participating in a growing community of Similarity Check System's users in order to ensure that the content published is original and trustworthy. Similarity Check is a medium that allows for comprehensive manuscripts screening, aimed to eliminate plagiarism and provide a high standard and quality peer-review process. Detailed description of the Similarity Check System can be found at: www.crossref.org/services/similarity-check/


Due to the current situation, the Journal of Water and Land Development has suspended scientific cooperation with Russian and Belarusian institutions as of February 24, 2022. Unfortunately, manuscripts from these countries will not be accepted for publication in our journal until further notice.


Payment fee:
1600 PLN +23%VAT or 300€ including 23% VAT*
(paper about 0.5 publishers sheet = 20,000 characters with spacies or 1,500 cm2 of figures).
For a volume exceeding 0.5 sheets, additionally paid in proportion to the exceedance.
*Bank transfer should be done as OUR (The transfer fees are expected to be paid before you initiate the transfer. This means the transfer amount is expected to be delivered in full to the beneficiary).

Konto bankowe (dane do przelewu krajowego):
Nazwa: Instytut Technologiczno-Przyrodniczy - Państwowy Instytut Badawczy
Adres: Falenty, al. Hrabska 3, 05-090 Raszyn
Bank: Alior Bank S.A. BIC (Swift- code): ALBPPLPW
Numer rachunku: PL40 2490 0005 0000 4530 9244 4533

Bank account for EUR payments:
Name: Institute of Technology and Life Sciences - National Research Institute
Address: Falenty, 3 Hrabska Avenue, Raszyn 05-090, Poland
Bank: Alior Bank S.A.
BIC (Swift- code): ALBPPLPW
Account number: IBAN - PL88 2490 0005 0000 4600 8830 5411






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Publication Ethics Policy

ETHICAL PRINCIPLES

Editors of the "Journal of Water and Land Development" pay attention to maintain ethical standards in scientific publications and undertake any possible measure to counteract neglecting the standards. Papers submitted for publication are evaluated with respect to reliability, conforming to ethical standards and the advancement of science. Principles given below are based on COPE's Best Practice Guidelines for Journal Editors, which may be found at:
http://publicationethics.org/files/u2/Best_Practice.pdf

Authors’ duties

Authorship
Authorship should be limited to persons, who markedly contributed to the idea, project, realization and interpretation of results. All of them have to be listed as co-authors. Other persons, who affected some important parts of the study should be listed or mentioned as co-workers. Author should be certain that all co-authors were enlisted, saw and accepted final version of the paper and agreed upon its publication.

Disclosure and conflict of interests
Author should disclose all sources of financing of his/her study, the input of scientific institutions, associations and other subjects and all important conflicts of interests that might affect results and interpretation of the study.

Standards in reporting
Authors of papers based on original studies should present precise description of performed work and objective discussion on its importance. Source data should be accurately presented in the paper. The paper should contain detailed information and references that would enable others to use it. False or intentionally not true declarations are not ethical and are not accepted by the editors.

Access to and storage of data
Authors may be asked for providing raw data used in the paper for editorial assessment and should be prepared to store them within the reasonable time period after publication.

Multiple, unnecessary and competitive publications
As a rule author should not publish papers describing the same studies in more than one journal or primary publication. Submission of the same paper to more than one journal at the same time is not ethical and prohibited.

Confirmation of sources
Author should cite papers that affected the creation of submitted manuscript and every time he/she should confirm the use of other authors’ work.

Important errors in published papers
When author finds an important error or inaccuracy in his/her paper, he/she is obliged to inform Editorial Office about this as soon as possible.

Originality and plagiarism
Author may submit only original papers. He/she should be certain that the names of authors referred to in the paper and/or fragments of their texts are properly cited or mentioned.

Ghostwriting
Ghost writing/guest authorship are manifestation of scientific unreliability and all such cases will be revealed including notification of appropriate subjects. Signs of scientific unreliability, especially violation of ethical principles in science will be documented by the Editorial Office.


Duties of the Editorial Office


Editors’ duties
Editors know the rules of journal editing including the procedures applied in case of uncovering non-ethical practices.

Decisions on publication
Editor-in Chief is obliged to apply present legal status as to defamation, violation of author’s rights and plagiarism and bears the responsibility for decisions. He/she may consult thematic editors and/or referees in that matter.

Selection of referees
Editorial Office provides appropriate selection of referees and takes care about appropriate course of peer –reviewing (the review has to be substantive).

Confidentiality
Every member of editorial team is not allowed to disclose information about submitted paper to any person except its author, referees, other advisors and editors.

Discrimination
To counteract discrimination the Editorial Office obeys the legally binding rules.

Disclosure and conflict of interests
Not published papers or their fragments cannot be used in the studies of editorial team or ref-erees without written consent of the author.


Referees' duties

Editorial decisions

Referee supports Editor-in-Chief in taking editorial decisions and may also support author in improving the paper.

Back information
In case a selected referee is not able to review the paper or cannot do it in due time period, he/she should inform secretary of the Editorial Office about this fact.

Objectivity standards
Reviews should be objective. Personal criticism is inappropriate. Referees should clearly ex-press their opinions and support them with proper arguments.

Confidentiality
All reviewed papers should be dealt with as confidential. They should not be discussed or revealed to persons other than the secretary of the Editorial Office.

Anonymity
All reviews should be made anonymously and the Editorial Office does not disclose names of the authors to referees.

Disclosure and conflict of interests
Confidential information or ideas resulting from reviewing procedure should be kept secret and should not be used to gain personal benefits. Referees should not review papers, which might generate conflict of interests resulting from relationships with the author, firm or institution involved in the study.

Confirmation of sources
Referees should indicate publications which are not referred to in the paper. Any statement that the observation, source or argument was described previously should be supported by appropriate citation. Referee should also inform the secretary of the Editorial Office about significant similarity to or partial overlapping of the reviewed paper with any other published paper and about suspected plagiarism.

Peer-review Procedure

Reviewing procedure

Procedure of reviewing submitted papers agrees with recommendations of the Ministry of Science and Higher Education published in a booklet: „Dobre praktyki w procedurach recenzyjnych w nauce”.
http://www.nauka.gov.pl/g2/oryginal/2014_02/307f933b1a75d6705a4406d5452d6dbf.pdf

Reviewing form may be downloaded from the Journal’s web page.

1. Papers submitted to the Editorial Office are primarily verified by editors withrespect to merit and formal issues. Texts with obvious errors (formatting other than requested, missing references, evidently low scientific quality) will be rejected at this stage.
2. Primarily accepted papers are sent to the two independent referees from outside the author’s institution, who:
  • have no conflict of interests with the author,
  • are not in professional relationships with the author,
  • are competent in a given discipline and have at least doctor’s degree and respective scientific achievements,
  • have unblemished reputation as reviewers.
3. In case of papers written in foreign language, at least one referee is affiliated in a foreign institution other than the author’s nationality.
4. Reviewing proceeds in the double blind process (authors and reviewers do notknow each other’s names) recommended by the Ministry.
5. A number is attributed to the paper to identify it in further stages of editorial procedure.
6. Potential referee obtains summary of the text and it is his/her decision upon accepting/rejecting the paper for review within a given time period.
7. Referees are obliged to keep opinions about the paper confidential and to not use knowledge about it before publication.
8. Review must have a written form and end up with an explicit conclusion about accepting or rejecting the paper from publication. Referee has a possibility to conclude his/her opinion in a form:
  • accept without revision;
  • accept with minor revision;
  • accept after major revision,
  • re-submission and further reviewing after complete re-arrangement of the paper,
  • reject.
9. Referee sends the review to the journal “Woda-Środowisko-Obszary Wiejskie”and “Problemy Inżynierii Rolniczej”by e-mail and in the printed undersigned form to the Editorial Office. Referee sends the review to the “Journal of Water and Land Development”by Editorial System. The review is archived there for 5 years.
10. Editors do not accept reviews, which do not conform to merit and formal rules of scientific reviewing like short positive or negative remarks not supported by a close scrutiny or definitely critical reviews with positive final conclusion and vice versa. Referee’s remarks are presented to the author. Rational and motivated conclusions are obligatory for the author. He/she has to consider all remarks and revise the text accordingly. Referee has the right to verify so revised text.
11. Author of the text has the right to comment referee’s conclusions in case he/she does not agree with them.
12. Editor-in Chief (supported by members of the Editorial Board) decides upon publication based on remarks and conclusions presented by referees, author’s comments and the final version of the manuscript.
13. Rules of acceptation or rejection of the paper and the review form are available at the web page of the Editorial House or the journal.
14. Once a year Editorial Office publishes present list of cooperating reviewers.
15. According to usual habit, reviewing is free of charge.
16. Papers rejected by referees are archived at the Editorial Office for 5 years.

Reviewers

Journal of Water and Land Development – List of reviewers – 2020

Prof. Aminuddin Ab Ghani - River Engineering and Urban Drainage Research Centre (REDAC), Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Abdelaziz Abdallaoui - Moulay Ismail University, Morocco
Assoc. Prof. Fahmy Abdelhaleem - Benha University, Cairo, Egypt
Dr. Yahiaoui Abdelhalim - Institute of Technology, University of Bouira, Algeria
Prof. Khaldi Abdelkrim - University of Science and Technology of Oran, Algeria
Dr. Jazuli Abdullahi - Near East University, Nicosia Cyprus
Prof. Taleb M. Abu-Sharar - University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
Prof. Bachir Achour - University of Biskra, Algeria
Dr. Mariusz Adynkiewicz – Piragas Institute of Meteorology and Water Management - National Research Institute, Poland
Prof. Mukhtar Ahmed - PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan; Washington State University, Pullman, USA; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden
Dr. Hayder Alalwan - Technical of Petrochemical, Middle Technical University, Iraq
Dr. Arif Alam - COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad Campus, Pakistan
Dr. Hudhaifa maan Al-Hamndi - Tikrit University, Iraq
Assoc. Prof. Ali Al-Hillo - University of Wasit, Iraq
Dr. Ammar Ali - Wageningen University, The Netherlands
Dr. Sayed Sabab Ali - Hanyang University South Korea, Korea (South)
Prof. Mehush Aliu - University of Mitrovica, Albania
Dr. Miran Al-Rammahi - University of Liverpool, United Kingdom
Assoc. Prof. Abdalrahman Alsulaili - Kuwait University, Safat, Kuwait
Dr. Raid Al-Tahir - University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
Dr. Mohd Anees - Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Jacek Antonkiewicz - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Nadjadji Anwar - Institut Teknologi Surabaya, Indonesia
Prof. Younas Aouine - Ibn Zohr University, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Morocco
Prof. Klaus Appenroth - Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany
Dr. Maria Adelaide Araujo Almeida - Polytechnic Institute of Beja, Portugal
Dr. Ozan Artun - Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey
Dr. Kentaka Aruga - Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Saitama City, Japan
Prof. Atilgan Atilgan - Isparta University of Applied Sciences, Turkey
Dr. Imen Ayadi - Higher Institute of Water Sciences and Techniques of Gabes, Tunisia
Assoc. Prof. Neveen Badawy - Benha University, Cairo, Egypt
Dr. Attoui Badra - Laboratory of Geology Badji Mokhtar University-Annaba, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Sławomir Bajkowski - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Hutaf Baker - Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Dr. Monika Balawejder - PWSTE The Bronisław Markiewicz State University of Technology and Eco-nomics in Jarosław, Poland
Prof. Ildefonso Baldiris-Navarro - Universidad de Cartagena, Colombia
Dr. Andres Barajas-Solano - Universidad Francisco de Paula Santander, Colombia
Prof. Icela Barcecó-Qiuntal- Metropolitan Autonomous University, Mexico City, Mexico
Dr. Arash Barjasteh - Khuzestan Water & Power Authority (KWPA), Iran
Prof. Erum Bashir - University of Karachi, Karach, Pakistan
Assoc. Prof. Łukasz Bąk - Kielce University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Mohamed Salah Belksier - University of Kasdi Merbah Ouargla, Algeria
Master Al-Amin Bello - Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Lahcen Benaabidate - University of Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Fès, Morocco
Dr. Aziz Benhamrouche - Ferhat Abbas University of Setif, Algeria
Master Ali Berghout - University of Bejaia, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Nka Nnomo Bernadette - Institute of Geological and Mining Research, Yaounde, Cameroon
Master Suraj Bhagat - Ton Duc Thang University, Viet Nam
Prof. Vijaya S. Bhaskara Rao - Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, India
Assoc. Prof. Muhammad Binbakar - Universiti Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Sumantra Biswas - Jawaharlal Nehru University/ Sukumar Sengupta Mahavidyalaya, New Delhi, India
Prof. Inga Bochoidze - Akaki Tsereteli State University, Kutaisi, Georgia
Assoc. Prof. Ilirjana Boci - University of Tirana, Albania
Prof. Andrzej Bogdał - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Nikolay I. Bogdanovich - Northern (Arctic) Federal University, Arkhangelsk, Russia
Dr. Gokcen Bombar - Izmir Katip Celebi University, Turkey
Prof. Ognjen Bonacci - Split University, Croatia
Assoc. Prof. Małgorzata Bonisławska - West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Prof. Dariusz Borowiak - University of Gdańsk, Poland
Dr. Frits Bos - CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis, The Hague, Netherlands
Prof. Hamid Bouchelkia - University of Tlemcen, Algeria
Master Mourad Boussekine - Badji Mokhtar University, Annaba, Algeria
Dr. Housseyn Bouzeria - Abou Bakr Belkaid University of Tlemcen, Algeria.
Dr. Andrzej Brandyk - Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krystyna Bryś - Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Assoc. Prof. John Buchanan - University of Tennessee, United States
Prof. Piotr Bugajski - University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Dr. Ewa Burszta-Adamiak - Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Dr. Erni Butar-Butar - Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Indonesia
Prof. Javier Cancela - University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Dr. Miguel Cañedo-Argüelles - University of Barcelona, Spain
Dr. Rushan Ceka - South East European University, Skopje, North Macedonia
Assoc. Prof. Peter Cepuder - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria
Prof. Simona Ceschin - Università Degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy
Assoc. Prof. Cem Polat Cetinkaya - Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey
Prof. Kwok-Wing Chau - Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China
Assoc. Prof. Abdelbaki Chérifa - Abou Bakr Belkaid, University, Tlemcen, Algeria
Dr. Younghyun Cho - K-water Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea (South)
Master Susan Cooper - King’s College London, United Kingdom
Dr. Agnieszka Cupak - Uniwersytet Rolniczy, Poland
Prof. Isa Curebal - Balıkesir University, Turkey
Prof. Stanisław Czaban - Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Dr. Justyna Czajkowska - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Wojciech Czekała - Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Przemyslaw Czerniejewski - Westpomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Ralf Dannowski - Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Land Use Research, Germany
Dr. Ammar Dawood - University of Basrah, Iraq
Dr. Paweł Dąbek - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Rutger de Graaf - University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Dr. Loris Deirmendjian - Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III, France
Assoc. Prof. Tamene Demissie - Jimma University, Ethiopia
Dr. Gustavo Díaz - University of Concepción, Chile
Assoc. Prof. Alsayed Dowidar - Hydraulics Research Institute - National Water Research Center, Shoubra El-Kheima, Egypt
Prof. Krzysztof Dragon - Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Sniazhana Dubianok - Central Research Institute for Complex Use of Water Resources (CRICUWR), Minsk, Belarus
Dr. Tomasz Dysarz - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Anarbekova Gulshat Dzhumabaevna - Kazakh National Agrarian University, Almaty, Kazakhstan
Dr. Hefni Effendi - Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia
Prof. Youssef El Guamri - Regional Centre for Careers of Education and Training, Marrakech, Morocco
Dr. Mokhtari Elhadj - University of Hassiba Ben Bouali Chlef, Algeria
Dr. Alaa El-Hazek - Benha University, Cairo, Egypt
Assoc. Prof. Abdeslam El-Jouni - Centre regional des Métiers de l’Education et de la Formation : CRMEF Tanger, Morocco
Prof. Mahmoud El-Tokhy - Benha University, Cairo, Egypt.
Prof. Evens Emmanuel - Quisqueya University, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Dr. María Esper Angillieri - Universidad Nacional de San Juan (UNSJ), Argentina
Prof. Alisher Fatxulloev - Tashkent Institute of Irrigation and Agricultural Mechanization Engineers, Uzbekistan
Assoc. Prof. Daniel Fomina - Kazan National Research Technological University, Russia
Dr. Mattias Gaglio - University of Ferrara, Italy
Dr. Małgorzata Gałczyńska - West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Givi Gavardashvili - Georgian Technical University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Dr. Paweł Gełesz - Academy of Fine Arts in Gdańsk, Poland
Dr. Yevheniy Gerasimov - National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Said Ghabayen - Natural Resources Conservation, Princeton, United States
Dr. Abbas Gholami - Shoaml University, Amol, Iran
Prof. Daniela Gogoase Nistoran - Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Dora Gomez - Universidad Pedagogica Nacional, Colombia
Dr. Ganzorig Gonchigsumlaa - Mongolian University of Life Sciences, Zaisan, Mongolia
Prof. Andrzej Greinert - University of Zielona Gora, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Antoni Grzywna - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. M.H.J.P. Gunarathna - Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Mihintale, Sri Lanka
Assoc. Prof. Robert Gwiazda - Institute of Nature Conservation of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków, Poland
Prof. Mohamed Habi - Tlemcen University, Algeria
Dr. Major Habiba - Badji Mokhtar University – Annaba, Algeria
Dr. Peter Halaj - Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Master Wiktor Halecki - University of Agriculture in Kraków, Poland
Dr. Abderrahmane Hamimed - Mascara University, Algeria
Prof. Lahoucine Hanich - Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Dr. Donny Harisuseno - University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Dr. Jakub Heciak - Kielce University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Henny Herawati - Tanjungpura University, Indonesia
Dr. Chaffai Hicham - Badji Mokhtar University – Annaba University, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Saeed Hoodfar - Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India
Prof. larbi Houichi - University of Batna 2, Algeria
Prof. Lyudmyla Hranovska - Institute of Irrigated Agriculture of NAAS, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Věra Hubačíková - Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Katarzyna Ignatowicz - Bialystok University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Masango Ilunga - University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Master Zhuldyzay Iskakova - Institute of Hydrogeology and Geoecology named after U.M. Ahmedsafina, Al-maty, Kazakhstan
Dr. Mateusz Jakubiak - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Grzegorz Janik - Wrocław University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Anna Januchta-Szostak - Poznan University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Elżbieta Jasińska - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Dr. Joanna Jaskuła - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Bartosz Jawecki - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Sabrine Jemai University of Sfax, Tunisia
Prof. Jerzy Jeznach - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Raimundo Jiménez-Ballesta - Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain
Prof. Csaba Juhász - University of Debrecen, Hungary
Dr. Grzegorz Kaczor - Uniwersytet Rolniczy w Krakowie, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Grzegorz Kaczor - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Mohammed Kadaoui - University Mohammed Premier, Oujda, Morocco
Master Sharad Kadbhane - Maratha Vidya Prasarak Samaj's, Karmaveer Adv. Baburao Ganpatrao Thakare College of Engineering, Nashik, India
Dr Dariusz Kayzer - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Tomasz Kałuża - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Joanna Kamińska - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ibrahim Kane - Umaru Musa Yar'adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Dr. Vasyl Karabyn - Lviv State University of Life Safety, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Agnieszka Karczmarczyk - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Robert Kasperek - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Kiyonori Kawasaki - Kagawa University, Japan
Dr. Mina Khosravi - Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran
Dr. Borys Khrystyuk - Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Institute, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Marianne Koller-Peroutka - University of Vienna, Austria
Prof. Anna Kołodziejczak - Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland
Prof. Marek Kopacz - AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland
Dr. Tomasz Kotowski - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Zile Alex Kouadio - Université Jean Lorougnon Guédé, Daloa, Ivory Coast
Prof. Victor Kovalchuk - National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Prof. Pyotr Kovalenko - Institute of Water Problems and Land Reclamation of NAAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Adam Kozioł - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Piotr Krajewski - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Irina Krish - Vladimir State University, Russia
Prof. Natalia Kuczyńska-Kippen - Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland
Dr. Deepak Kumar - G.B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, India
Dr. Karolina Kurek - University of Agriculture in Kraków, Poland
Dr. Stanisław Lach - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Prof. Lenka Lackóová - Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra; Slovak Republic
Prof. László Lakatos - Eszterhazy Karoly University (The University of Eger), Hungary
Assoc. Prof. Maciej Lasocki - Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Niharika Lata - National Institute of Technology Patna, India
Dr. Okanlade Lawal-Adebowale - Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria
Dr. Jeffrey León Pulido - EAN University, Bogota, Colombia
Dr. Jaakko Leppänen - University of Helsinki, Finland
Assoc. Prof. Jacek Leśny - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Han Lijian - Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Prof. Lily Limantara - University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Prof. Fedor Lisetskii - Belgorod State National Research University, Belgorod, Russia
Prof. Jurik Lubos - Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Prof. Jaafar Maatooq - University of Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Master Mohd Mahamud - Universiti Sains Malaysia, George Town, Malaysia
Prof. Myroslav Malovanyy - Lviv Polytechnic National University, Ukraine
Dr. Eduardo Martínez-Gomariz - Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain
Costantino Masciopinto - National Research Council, Rome, Water Research Institute, Bari, Italy
Dr. Natalya Matvienko - Institute of Fisheries of the National Academyof Agrarian Sciences, Kyiv 03164, Ukraine
Prof. Jan Mazurkiewicz - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Bruno Mazzorana - Universidad Austral de Chile
Dr. Agnieszka Mąkosza - West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Lakhdar Mebarki - University of Bechar, Algeria
Prof. Mohamed Meddi - Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Hydraulique, Blida, Algeria
Dr. Ali Mehran - University of North Georgia, United States
Dr. José Alberto Herrera Melián - University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
Dr. Orest Melnichuk - Institute of Ecology and Geography, Academy of Sciences, Kishinev, Moldova
Prof. Leopoldo Mendoza-Espinosa - Autonomous University of Baja California, Ensenada, Mexico
Dr. Gabriel Minea - National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Małgorzata Mirecka - Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Dorota Mirosław-Świątek - Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Dariusz Młyński - University of Agriculture in Kraków, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Dariusz Młyński - University of Agriculture in Kraków, Poland
Prof. Djidel Mohamed - Université Kasdi Merbah Ouargla, Algeria
Dr. Amir Molajou - Iran University of Science & Technology, Iran
Prof. Changho Moon - Kunsan National University, Korea (South)
Assoc. Prof. Matthew Morris - Ambrose University, Calgary, Canada
Prof. Józef Mosiej - Warsaw University of Life Scieces -SGGW, Poland
Prof. Jacek Motyka - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Dr. Dounia Mrad - University Badji Mokhtar Annaba, Algeria
Dr. Basil Mugonola - Gulu University (GU), Uganda
Prof. Zainal Muktamar - University of Bengkulu, Indonesia
Prof. Ismet Mulliqi - University of Mitrovica "Isa Boletini", Albania
Dr. Magdalena Myszura - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Marco Napoli - University of Florence, Italy
Dr. Arkadiusz Nędzarek - West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Jacek Niedźwiecki - Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Puławy, Poland
Dr. Constantin Nistor - University of Bucharest, Romania
Prof. Ainin Niswati - Lampung University, Indonesia
Dr. Tomasz Noszczyk - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Vahid Nourani - University of Tabriz, Iran
Prof. Laftouhi Noureddine - Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Dr. Washington Nyabeze - WR Nyabeze and Associates, Johannesburg, South Africa
Dr. Clement Nyamekye - Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
Prof. Ryszard Oleszczuk - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Beata Olszewska - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Amal Omer - Desert Research Center, Cairo, Egypt., Egypt
Prof. El-Sayed Omran - Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
Dr. David Onu - Federal College of Education, Zaria
Dr. Agnieszka Operacz - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Petra Oppeltová - Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Mehmet Ali Ozler - Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Turkey
Assoc. Prof. Carmen Palau - Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain
Prof. Zuzana Palkova - Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Dr. Avinash Pandey - Metahelix Life Science Ltd., Bangalore, India
Assoc. Prof. Ghanshyam Patle - Central Agricultural University Imphal, India
Prof. Katarzyna Pawęska - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Zbigniew Piepiora - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Edward Pierzgalski - Forest Research Institute, Sękocin, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Oleg Pinchuk - National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Santosh Pingale - National Institute of Hydrology Roorkee, India
Dr. Mikołaj Piniewski - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Agatha Piranti - Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia
Assoc. Prof. Karol Plesiński - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Ryszard Pokładek - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Agnieszka Policht-Latawiec - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Master Katja Polotzek - Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden, Germany
Dr. BVG Prasad - DR Y.S.R. Horticultural University, Andhra Pradesh, India
Dr. Michaela Prescott - Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Dr. Wiesław Ptach - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Antonio Pulido Bosch - University of Almeria, Spain
Assoc. Prof. Doni Putra - Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Dr. Erik Querner - Querner Consult, Wageningen, Netherlands
Assoc. Prof. Kinga Racoń-Leja - Cracow University of Technology, Kraków, Poland
Dr. Koteswara K. Rao - Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, India
Dr. Iwan Ridwansyah - Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Jakarta, Indonesia
Prof. Anatoliy Rokochinsky - National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Joanna Rodziewicz - University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Roman Rolbiecki - UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Stanislav Ruman - University of Ostrava, Czech Republic
Dr. Holger Rupp - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Halle, Germany
Dr. Katarzyna Rymuza - University of Natural Sciences and Humanities in Siedlce, Poland
Prof. Andrii Safonyk National University for Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Prof. Carlos Salazar-Briones - Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexicali, Mexico
Assoc. Prof. Luqmon Samiev - Tashkent Institute of Irrigation and Agricultural Mechanization Engineers, Uzbekistan
Dr. Abba Sani Isah - Yusuf Maitama Sule University, Kano, Nigeria, Nigeria
Dr. Veronica Sarateanu - Agriculture Faculty, Banat's University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine "King Michael I of Romania", Timisoara, Romania
Prof. Miklas Scholz - Lund University, Sweden
Prof. Moosa Sedibe - Central University of Technology, Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Dr. Joanna Sender - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Marcus Senra - Unversidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Dr. Artur Serafin - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Muhammad Setiawan - Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Prof. Abdol Aziz Shahraki - Regional Studies, The Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden
Dr. Andrzej Shatkowski - Institute of Water Problems and Land Reclamation, Kharkiv, Ukraine
Dr. Abdrabbo Shehata AbouKheira - Water Management Research Institute, El Qanater El Khayreya, Egypt
Dr. Rituraj Shukla - University of Guelph, Canada
Prof. Tadeusz Siwiec - Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Sergiy Snizhko - Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Chen Soo - Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Kota Samarahan, Malaysia,
Dr. Marcin Spychała - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Rafał Stasik - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Tatyana Stefanovska - National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Radosław Stodolak - Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ery Suhartanto - University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Dr. Lagudu Surinaidu - National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad, India
Prof. Dwita Sutjiningsih - University of Indonesia, Depok , Indonesia
Assoc. Prof. Serhiy Syrotyuk - Lviv National Agrarian University, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Sandor Szalai - Szent István University, Godollo, Hungary
Dr. Jan Szatyłowicz - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Szymon Szewrański - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Szulc - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Szulczewski - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Kassa Tadele - Arba Minch University, Ethiopia
Dr. Kassahun Tadesse - University of Johannesburg, South Africa
Dr. Samuel Takele - National Institute of Meteorological Sciences, Seogwipo-si, Jeju-doKorea (South)
Prof. Fatima Zohra Tebbi - University of Batna, Algeria
Prof. Alo Tito - Department of Water Engineering and Chemistry, Italy
Prof. Mukesh Tiwari - Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India
Dr. Katarzyna Tokarczyk-Dorociak - Wrocław Universiy of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Rachid Touir - Centre Régional des Métiers de l’Éducation et de la Formation (CRMEF), Rabat, Morocco
Le Tu - Nong Lam University, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam
Prof. Serghiy Vambol - Kharkiv National Technical University of Agriculture after P. Vasilenko, Ukraine
Dr. Iryna Vaskina - Sumy State University, Ukraine
Prof. Magdalena Vaverková - Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Dr. Ileana Vera-Reyes - Centro de Investigación en Química Aplicada, Mexico, Mexico
Prof. Aliaksandr Volchak - Brest State Technical University, Belarus
Prof. Jan Vymazal - Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Czech Republic
Dr. Tong Wang - Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
Dr. Rafal Wawer - Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Master Wessam Wessam - Agricultural Engineering Research Institute, Giza, Egypt
Dr. Ewa Wiśniowska - Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Franciszek Woch - Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Prof. Małgorzata Wojtkowska - Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Lu Xiwu - Southeast University, Nanjing, China
Prof. Mamuye Yusuf - Jimma University, Ethiopia
Prof. Mariusz Zadworny - Czestochowa University of Technology (CUT) Faculty of Civil Engineering, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Liliana Zaharia - University of Bucarest, Romania
Dr. Kateb Zakaria - Tlemcen University, Algeria
Prof. Jarosław Zawadzki - Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Aziez Zeddouiri - University of Kasdi Merbah Ouargla, Algeria
Prof. Bakenaz A. Zeidan - Tanta University, Egypt
Dr. Noureddine Zenati - University of Messaadia Med Cherif, Souk-Ahras, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Hamsa Zubaidi - Oregon State University, Corvallis, United States
Dr. Tomasz Zubala - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Anna Źróbek-Sokolnik - University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Jacek Żarski - UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland


Journal of Water and Land Development – List of reviewers – 2019

Prof. Yahiaoui Abdelkrim – University of Bechar, Algeria
Prof. Habib Abida – University of Sfax, Tunesia Tjahyo Adji – Univesitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Prof. Klaus Appenroth – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany
Dr Maria Adelaide Araujo Almeida – Polytechnic Institute of Beja, Portugal
Dr Eli Argaman – Soil Erosion Research Station, Ministry of Agriculture, Rishon Lezion, Israel
Dr John Awu – National Centre for Agricultural Mechanization, Ilorin, Nigeria
Prof. Aleksandra Badora – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Sławomir Bajkowski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Arturas Bautrenas – Vilnius Unversity, Vilnius, Lituania
Dr. Aleksanda Bawiec – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Łukasz Bąk – Kielce University of Technology, Kielce, Poland
Prof. Bourhane Belabed – Badji Mokhtar – Annaba University, Algeria
Dr. Tomasz Bergel – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr Ramon Bienes –Instituto Madrileño de Investigación y Desarrollo Rural Agrario y Alimentario, Madrid, Spain
Dr. Małgorzata Biniak-Pieróg – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Andrzej Bogdał – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Dr. Alaba Boluwade – McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Prof. Hamid Bouchelkia – University of Tlemcen, Algeria
Dr. Andrzej Brandyk – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krystyna Bryś – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Dr. Piotr Bugajski – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Dr Ewa Burszta-Adamiak – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Irena Burzyńska – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Dr Agnieszka Bus – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Hazir Çadraku – University for Business and Technology, Pristina, Kosovo
Prof. Bogdan Chojnicki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Andrea Cominola – Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
Dr. Agnieszka Cupak – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Dr. Justyna Czajkowska – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krzysztof Czerwionka – Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Ewa Dacewicz – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Jacek Dach – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Jan Damicz – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Ralf Dannowski – Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Land Use Research, Germany
Dr Paweł Dąbek – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Prof. Halina Dąbkowska-Naskręt – University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Oussama Derdous – Université Kasdi Merbah Ouargla, Algeria
Prof. Jean Diatta – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Jean-Christophe Diepart – Université de Liège, Belgium
Dr Bujar Durmishi – University of Tetova, North Macedonia
Dr. Tomasz Dysarz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Mahmoud El-Tokhy – Benha University, Egypt
Prof. Evens Emmanuel – Quisqueya University, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Dr. Tomasz Falkowski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Fernando Fan – Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Prof. Janos Fehér – University of Debrecen, Hungary
Dr. Beata Fortuna-Antoszkiewicz – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Junior Garcia – Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil
Prof. Wiesław Gądek – Cracow University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Givi Gavardashvili – Georgian Water Managment Institute, Tbilisi, Georgia
Assoc. Prof. Małgorzata Gałczyńska – West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Poland
Dr Paweł Gełesz – Academy of Fine Arts in Gdańsk, Poland
Dr Jakub Gołębiewski – West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Poland
Prof. Renata Graf – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Rutger de Graaf – Hogeschool Rotterdam, Netherlands
Dr. Antoni Grzywna – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr Adam Górecki – Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krzysztof Górecki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Asssoc. Prof. Burak Gürel – Koç University,Istanbul, Turkey
Prof. Mohamed Habi – University of Tlemcen, Algeria
Dr. Peter Halaj – Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Dr. Younes Hamed – Gafsa University, Tunisia
Dr. Mateusz Hammerling – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. prof. Paweł Hanus – AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland
Dr Henny Herawati – Tanjungpura University, Pontianak, Indonesia
Dr Edyta Hewelke – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Nur Islami – Universitas Riau, Pekanbaru, Indonesia
Assoc. prof. Darja Istenič – University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Assoc. prof. Mohammad Hossein Jahangir – University of Tehran, Iran
Prof. Anna Januchta-Szostak – Poznan University of Technology, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Anna Jaroszewicz – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Assoc. prof. Bartosz Jawecki – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Jeznach – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Csaba Juhász – University of Debrecen, Hungary
Prof. Pierre Y. Julien – Colorado State University, Fort Collins, United States
Prof. Edmund Kaca – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Grzegorz Kaczor – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Assoc. prof. Eliza Kalbarczyk – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Tomasz Kałuża – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Agnieszka Karczmarczyk – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr Ignacy Kardel – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Cezary Kaźmierowski – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Kamel Khanchoul – Badji Mokhtar – Annaba University, Algeria
Dr. Adam Kiczko – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Roman Kisiel – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr Oleksandr Klimenko – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Dr. Apoloniusz Kodura – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Silvia Kohnová – Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic
Prof. Tomasz Kolerski – Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland
Dr Katarzyna Kołecka – Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Marek Kopacz – AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Assoc. prof. Radovan Kopp – Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Ján Koščo – University of Presov, Slovak Republic
Prof. Viktor Kovalchuk – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Prof. Pyotr Kovalenko – Ukrainian Academy of Agricultural Engineering and Land Reclamation, Kiev, Ukraine
Assoc. prof. Tomasz Kowalczyk – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr Alina Kowalczyk-Juśko – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr Michał Kozłowski – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Kozyra – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Puławy, Poland
Dr Piotr Krajewski – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr Katarzyna Krężałek – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Mykhailo Kropyvko – Natsional′nyy Naukovyy Tsentr "Instytut Ahrarnoyi Ekonomiky", Kiev, Ukraine
Prof. Zygmunt Kruczek – University of Physical Education in Cracow, Poland
Dr. Michł Kubrak – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Bogdan Kulig – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Dr. Karolina Kurek – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Kustamar Kustamar – Institut Teknologi Nasional Malang, Indonesia
Prof. Marek Kułażyński – Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Poland
Dr. Stanisław Lach –AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Prof. László Lakatos – Eszterhazy Karoly University, Eger, Hungary
Prof. Krzysztof Lejcuś – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Przemysław Leń – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland,
Dr Jaakko Leppänen – Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo
Prof. Daniel Liberacki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Lily Limantara – University of Brawijaya, Indonesi
Dr. Wiesława Lizińska – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr Imed Loukam – Mohamed-Cherif Messaadia University, Souk-Ahras, Algeria
Prof. Jurik Lubos – Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Slovak Republic
Prof. Andrzej Łachacz – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Michał Łopata – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Chandra Madramootoo – McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Prof. Boutiba Makhlouf – University of Science and Technology Houari Boumediene, Algeria
Prof. Małgorzata Makowska – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Myroslav Malovanyy – Lviv Polytechnic National University, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Andrii Martyn – National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev,Ukraine
Dr. Michał Marzec –University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Jakub Mazurkiewicz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jan Mazurkiewicz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Constantine Mbajiorgu – University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
Assoc. Prof. Monika Mika – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Gabriel Minea – National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, Romania
Dr. Małgorzata Mirecka – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Dariusz Młyński – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Prof. Changho Moon – Kunsan National University, South Korea
Prof. Viktor Moshynskyi – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Ukraine
Prof. Józef Mosiej – Warsaw University of Life Scieces – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Rachedi Mounira – Université Chadli Bendjedid -El Tarf, Algeria
Dr. Dounia Mrad – Badji Mokhtar - Annaba University, Algeria
Dr Somphinith Muangthong – Rajamangala University of Technology Isan, Nakorn Ratchasima, Thailand
Prof. Ismet Mulliqi – University of Mitrovica "Isa Boletini", Albania
Dr. Reinhard Nolz – Institute of Hydrology, Slovak Academy of Sciences (IH SAS), Slovakia, Slovak Republic
Dr. Michael Nones – Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
Prof. Lucyna Nyka – Gdansk University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Hanna Obarska-Pempkowiak – Gdansk University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Grzegorz Oleniacz – Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Beata Olszewska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ednah Onyari –University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Dr. Agnieszka Operacz – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr Petra Oppeltová – Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Zuzana Palkova – Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Assoc. Prof. Jana Pařílková – Brno University of Technology, Brno, Czech Republic
Assoc. Prof. Krzysztof. Parylak – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Katarzyna Pawęska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Anna Pawlikowska-Piechotka – Józef Piłsudski University of Physical Education, Warsaw, Poland
Prof. Grzegorz Pęczkowski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Roman Petrus – Ignacy Łukasiewicz Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Janina Piekutin – Bialystok University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Edward Pierzgalski – Forest Research Institute, Sękocin, Poland
Dr. Santosh Pingale – Arba Minch University, Ethiopia
Dr. Karol Plesiński – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr Sandra Poikane – European Commission, Joint Research Cenre, Brussles, Belgium
Prof. Ryszard Pokładek – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Agnieszka Policht-Latawiec – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Popek – Warsaw University of Life Scieces – SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Dorota Porowska – Warsaw University, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Brbara Prus – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Wioletta Przystaś – Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Dr. Erik Querner – Querner Consult, Wageningen, Netherlands
Dr. Kinga Racoń-Leja – Cracow University of Technology, Poland
Anatoliy Rokochinskyi – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Dr. Roman Rolbiecki – UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Giovanna Rossato – Progetto CMR, Milan, Italy
Dr. James Roumasset – University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Hawaii, United States
Dr. Oleksandr Rudik – Kherson State Agrarian University, Ukraine
Dr. Holger Rupp – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany
Dr. Kamila Rybczyńska-Tkaczyk – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Dr. Katarzyna Rymuza – University of Natural Sciences and Humanities in Siedlce, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Anrzej Samborski – The State School of Higher Education in Zamość, Poland
Dr. Artur Serafin – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Prf. Abdelkader Seyd – Université Kasdi Merbah de Ouargla, Algeria
Dr. Tamara Shevchenko –O.M. Beketov National University of Urban Economy in Kharkiv, Ukraine
Prof. Vasil Simeonov – University of Sofia „St. Kliment Ohridski”, Bulgaria"
Prof. Tadeusz Siwiec – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Zdzisław Skutnik – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Karolina Smarzyńska – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Sobota – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Mariusz Sojka – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Reza Sokouti – West Azarbaijan Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Training Center, AREEO, Uromieh, Iran
Prof. Joaquín Solana-Gutiérrez – Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
Prof. Krystyna Solarek – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Tatiana Solovey – Polish Geological Institute, Warsaw, Poland
Dr Piotr Sołowiej – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr Urszula Somorowska – University of Warsaw, Poland
Dr. Cristina Sorana Ionescu– Polytechnic University of Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Marcin Spychała – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Piotr Stachowski – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Radosław Stodolak – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr Jan Szatyłowicz – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Prof. Szymon Szewrański – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Szulczewski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Tomasz Szymczak – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Dr. Anna Tofiluk – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Iryna Vaskina – Sumy State University, Sumy, Ukraine
Prof. Jan Vymazal – Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic
Dr. Rafał Wawer – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Prof. Mirosław Wiatkowski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Joanna Wibig – University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
Dr. Joanna Wicher-Dysarz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ewelina Widelska – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr Paweł Wilk – Polish Institute of Meteorology and Water Management, Warsaw, Poland
Dr. Justyna Wójcik-Leń – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Krishna Yadav – Bundelkhand University Jhansi, India
Assoc. Prof. Işil Yildirim – Beykent Üniversitesi, Istanbul, Turkey
Dr. Ewa Zabłocka-Godlewska – Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Prof. Mariusz Zadworny – Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Ewelina Zając – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jan Zarzycki – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jarosław Zawadzki – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Paweł Zawadzki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Bakenaz A. Zeidan – Tanta University, Egypt
Dr. Tomasz Zubala – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Zwoliński – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Jacek Żarski – University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Miroslaw Żelazny – Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland
Prof. Andrzej Żyromski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Anna Źróbek-Sokolnik – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland

Journal of Water and Land Development – List of reviewers – 2018

Prof. Aminuddin Ab Ghani – Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Yahiaoui Abdelkrim – University of Bechar, Algeria
Prof. Habib Abida – University of Sfax, Tunisia
Prof. Mehush Aliu – University of Mitrovica, Albania
Dr. B. Boudad – Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, Morocco
Dr. Sofia Bahroun – Badji Mokhtar University of Annaba, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Sławomir Bajkowski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Łukasz Bąk – Kielce University of Technology, Kielce, Poland
Prof. Kazimierz Banasik – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Aliyu Salisu Barau – Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria
Prof. Icela Barcecó-Qiuntal – Metropolitan Autonomous University, Mexico City, Mexico
Dr. Kirk L. Barnett – Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Australia
Prof. Moussa Benhamza – Badji Mokhtar University, Annaba, Algeria
Prof. Tomasz Bergel – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Małgorzata Biniak-Pieróg – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Jan Bondaruk – Central Mining Institute, Katowice, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Brodziński – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krystyna Bryś – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Wrocław, Poland
Prof. Teresa Brzezińska-Wójcik – Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland
Prof. Piotr Bugajski – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Bykowski – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Vincent Chaplot – Pierre and Marie Curie Unversity – Paris 6, France
Prof. Bogdan Chojnicki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Wojciech Czekala – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Robert Czerniawski – University of Szczecin, Poland
Prof. Przemyslaw Czerniejewski – West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krzysztof Czerwionka – Gdańsk Uniwersity of Technology, Poland
Prof. Franciszek Czyżyk – Institute of Technology and Life Sciences. Falenty, Poland
Dr. Paweł Dąbek – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Jolanta Dąbrowska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ralf Dannowski – Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Land Use Research, Germany
Prof. Bożena Dębska – UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Yousfi Djaffar – National Center for Space Technology, Algeria
Prof. Wojciech Dobicki – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Rebecca S. Dodder – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, North Carolina, United States
Dr. Tomasz Dysarz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Evens Emmanuel – Quisqueya University, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Prof. Andrzej Eymontt – Institute of Technology and Life Sciences, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Tomasz Falkowski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Krzysztof Fortuniak – University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Gądek – Cracow University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Magdalena Gajewska – Gdansk University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Renata Gamrat – West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Givi Gavardashvili – Georgian Water Managment Institute, Tbilisi, Georgia
Dr. Yevheniy Gerasimov – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Dr. Abbas Gholami – Shoaml University, Amol, Iran
Prof. Daniela Gogoase Nistoran – University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Iurii Golubinka – Lviv Polytechnic National University, Ukraine
Dr. Roopali V. Goyal – Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel Institute of Technology, Vasad, India
Prof. Ryszard Gołdyn – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Jolanta Grochowska – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Jacek Grzyb – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Dr. Antoni Grzywna – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Younes Hamed – Gafsa University, Tunisia
Prof. Eko Handayanto – University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Dr. Helvi Heinonen-Tanski – University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland
Dr. Leszek Hejduk – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Beata Hejmanowska – AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Prof. Piotr Ilnicki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Jeznach – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Krzysztof Jóżwiakowski – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Prof. Csaba Juhász – University of Debrecen, Hungary
Prof. Tibangayuka Kabanda – North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
Prof. Edmund Kaca – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Tomasz Kałuża - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Andrzej Kapusta – Inland Fisheries Institute, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Nouha Kaouachi – Mouhamed Sherif Messaadia University of Souk-Ahras, Algeria
Dr. Willia Khati – University of Chadli Ben Djedid, El-Tarf, Algeria
Prof. Abdul Khan – University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan
Dr. Adam Kiczko – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Roman Kisiel – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Małgorzata Kleniewska – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Iwona Kłosok-Bazan – Opole University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Silvia Kohnová – Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic
Prof. Tomasz Kolerski – Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Marek Kopacz – AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Prof. Pyotr Kovalenko – Ukrainian Academy of Agricultural Engineering and Land Reclamation, Kiev, Ukraine
Dr. Agnieszka Kowalczyk – Institute of Technology and Life Sciences, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Andrzej Krasiński – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Janusz Kubrak – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Karolina Kurek – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Dr. Rekha Kushwaha – University of Kentucky, Lexington, United States
Dr. Stanisław Lach –AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Dr. Lenka Lackóová – Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Slovak Republic
Dr. Günter Langergraber – University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria
Prof. Krzysztof Lejcuś – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Przemysław Leń – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland,
Prof. Jacek Leśny – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Daniel Liberacki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Zhaoewei Liu – Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Prof. Wiesława Lizińska – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Jurik Lubos – Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Slovak Republic
Prof. Andrzej Łachacz – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Carmen Maftei – Ovidius University of Constanta, Romania
Prof. Artur Magnuszewski – University of Warsaw, Poland
Prof. Grzegorz Majewski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Prof. Małgorzata Makowska – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Krystyna Malińska – Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Jacky Mania – Lille 1 University, France
Prof. Petro Martynyuk – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Prof. Viktor Maxin – National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Prof. Małgorzata Mazurek – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Jakub Mazurkiewicz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jan Mazurkiewicz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Stanisław Mejza – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Maria Teresa Melis – University of Cagliari, Italy
Prof. Marta Menéndez Fernández –University of León, Spain
Prof. Monika Mika – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Gabriel Minea –National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, Bucharest, Romania
Prof. Sevastel Mircea – University of Agronomic Science and Veterinary Medicine, Bucharest, Romania
Dr. El-Hadj Mokhtari – University of Hassiba Ben Bouali, Chlef, Algeria
Dr. Piotr Moniewski – Regional Inspectorate of Environmental Protection in Lodz, Poland
Prof. Józef Mosiej – Warsaw University of Life Scieces – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Amitouche Mourad – M’Hamed Bouguerra University of Boumerdes, Algeria
Prof. Ismet Mulliqi – University of Mitrovica "Isa Boletini", Albania
Dr. Tommaso Musner –University of Padua, Italy
Prof. Fulbert Namwamba – Southern University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States
Prof. Abdelazim Mohamed Abdelhamid Negm – Zagazig University, Egypt
Prof. Irena Niedźwiecka-Filipiak – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Kamil Nieścioruk – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Witold Nocoń – Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Prof. Laftouhi Noureddine – Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Dr. Mojtaba Noury – Islamic Azad University, Malard Branch, Malard, Iran
Dr. Eugeniusz Nowocień – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Dr. Grzegorz Oleniacz – Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Beata Olszewska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ednah Onyari –University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Dr. Agnieszka Operacz – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Bogdan Ozga-Zieliński – Institute of Meteorology and Water Management - State Research Institute, Warsaw, Poland
Prof. Katarzyna Pawęska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jan Pawełek – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jan Pawlak – Institute of Technology and Life Sciences, Falenty, Poland
Dr. Grzegorz Pęczkowski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Velta Persova – Latvian Agricultural University, Jelgava, Latvia
Prof. Edward Pierzgalski – Forest Research Institute, Sękocin, Poland
Prof. Stefan Pietrzak – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Dr. Iwona Pińskwar – Institute for Agricultural and Forest Environment, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Karol Plesiński – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Ryszard Pokładek – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Agnieszka Policht-Latawiec – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Popek – Warsaw University of Life Scieces – SGGW, Poland
Prof. Prakash D. Porey – Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Surat; Indian Society for Hydraulics, Khadakwasla; Indian Society for Wind Engineering, India
Dr. Erik Querner – Querner Consult, Wageningen, Netherlands
Dr. S. Abdul Rahaman – Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, India
Prof. Tomasz Rozbicki – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Prof. Roman Rolbiecki - University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Master Suhaila Sahat – Universiti Tun Hussein Onn, Parit Raja, Malaysia
Dr. Roberto Serrano-Notivoli – University of Zaragoza, Spain
Prof. Abdol Aziz Shahraki – The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
Dr. Tamara Shevchenko –O.M. Beketov National University of Urban Economy in Kharkiv, Ukraine
Dr. Sergey Shevchuk – Institute of Water Problems and Land Reclamation of the National Academy of Agrarian Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Master Kodicherla Shiva Prashanth Kumar – Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou, China
Prof. Vasil Simeonov – University of Sofia „St. Kliment Ohridski”, Bulgaria"
Prof. Umesh Singh – Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Prof. Tadeusz Siwiec – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Mirosław Skorbiłowicz – Bialystok University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Izabela Skrzypczak – Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Dr Andrzej Skwierawski – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Mariusz Sojka – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Adam Sokołowski – University of Gdansk, Poland
Dr. Marcin Spychała – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Sroka – Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland
Prof. Piotr Stachowski – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Rafał Stasik – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Ruzica Stricevic – University of Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Bagong Suyanto – Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia
Prof. Lech Szajdak – Institute for Agricultural and Forest Environment, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Szymon Szewrański – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Szulczewski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Maciej Szwast – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Tomasz Szymczak – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Edmund Tomaszewski – University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
Prof. Waldemar Treder – Research Institute of Horticulture, Skierniewice, Poland
Dr. Krzysztof Ukalski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Andrés Vargas – Pontifical Xavierian University, Bogota, Colombia
Prof. Magdalena Vaverková – Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Liana Vuta – University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Raphael Wambua – Egerton University, Kenya
Dr. Rafał Wawer – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Prof. Mirosław Wiatkowski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Joanna Wibig – University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
Dr. Joanna Wicher-Dysarz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Barbara Wiśniowska-Kielian – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Franciszek Woch – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Dr. Nurul hila Zainuddin – Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia
Prof. Jarosław Zawadzki – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Aziez Zeddouiri – University of Ouargla, Algeria
Prof. Abdel Razik Ahmed Zidan – Mansoura University, Egypt
Prof. Agnieszka Zwirowicz-Rutkowska – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Zwolinski – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Tymoteusz Zydroń – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jacek Żarski –UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Prof. Miroslaw Żelazny – Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland
Prof. Romuald Żmuda – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Andrzej Żyromski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Anna Źróbek-Sokolnik – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland

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