Search results

Filters

  • Journals
  • Date

Search results

Number of results: 2
items per page: 25 50 75
Sort by:

Abstract

Eutectoid growth, as the important reaction mechanism of the carbon steel heat treatment, is the basis to control the microstructure and performance. At present, most studies have focused on lamellar growth, and did not consider the nucleation process. Mainly due to the nucleation theory is inconclusive, a lot of research can support their own theory in a certain range. Based on the existing nucleation theory, this paper proposes a cooperative nucleation model to simulate the nucleation process of eutectoid growth. In order to ensure that the nucleation process is more suitable to the theoretical results, different correction methods were used to amend the model respectively. The results of numerical simulation show that when the model is unmodified, the lateral growth of single phase is faster than that of longitudinal growth, so the morphology is oval. Then, the effects of diffusion correction, mobility correction and ledges nucleation mechanism correction on the morphology of nucleation and the nucleation rate were studied respectively. It was found that the introduction of boundary diffusion and the nucleation mechanism of the ledges could lead to a more realistic pearlite.
Go to article

Abstract

In this paper, the deviation from eutectic composition in boundary layer for eutectic growth is studied by phase-field method. According to a series of artificial phase diagram, the lamellar eutectic growth of these alloy is simulated during directional solidification. At steady state, average growth velocity of eutectic lamella is equal to the pulling velocity. With the increasing of the liquidus slope of β phase, the average composition in boundary layer would deviate from eutectic composition and the deviation increases. The constitutional undercooling difference between both solid phases caused by the deviation increases with the increasing of the deviation. The β phase would develop a depression under the influence of the deviation.
Go to article

This page uses 'cookies'. Learn more